Athletic Training Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outline the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

This program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), which allows students to take the Board of Certification (BOC) Examination. After successful completion of the BOC examination, an individual will hold the credential of a certified athletic trainer (ATC). Students should make formal application to the Athletic Training (AT) Program through the Director of Athletic Training during the spring semester of their first year. The selection criteria are posted on the Castleton Athletic Training web site, and are also explained in AHS 1060 - Introduction to the Athletic Training Profession. Enrollment in this program is limited and merely completing the application process does not guarantee admission into the program. Once accepted into the program, students must complete six semesters of clinical field experiences working under the direct supervision of a preceptor at Castleton or an approved site. Any student may take courses within the program; however only students formally accepted into the AT Program may serve as athletic training students and participate in the clinical field experience.

Transfer students must follow the same application process and course sequence as traditional students and should meet with the Director of the AT Program early in the admissions process. The Director must approve the transfer of athletic training content courses. The Reapplication and Transfer Policy is available on the Castleton AT web site. Students must meet minimum health and technical standard requirements to be eligible to participate in the AT Program. The health and technical standards can be found in the AT Program Application Materials, which are available on the Castleton AT web site. In addition, once accepted into the AT Program, students must meet minimum academic and clinical retention requirements. These requirements are outlined in the AT Program Student Handbook which is available in electronic form on the web site. The clinical field experience requires travel to off-campus sites that would necessitate the use of a vehicle and involve associated travel expenses. Additional program expenses include course fees on all clinical courses.

Athletic Training Education Mission Statement

The mission of the CAATE- accredited AT Program at Castleton is to provide a comprehensive and progressive academic and clinical education experience for students. This experience at Castleton will prepare students to pass the Board of Certification (BOC) examination and achieve entry level employment in the field of Athletic Training. The AT Program will provide formal instruction and clinical training in the following content areas:

  • Evidence-Based Practice
  • Clinical Examination and Diagnosis
  • Therapeutic Interventions
  • Psychosocial Strategies and Referral
  • Prevention and Health Promotion
  • Acute Care of Injury and Illness
  • Health Care Administration
  • Professional Development and Responsibility

The AT Program accepts the overall mission of Castleton to provide the opportunity for intellectual and personal growth of students through excellence in teaching, close student-faculty interaction, numerous opportunities for out of classroom learning, and an active and supportive campus community. The AT Program strives to prepare students for meaningful careers, further academic pursuits, and productive citizenship.

Athletic Training Program Goals
  1. Students will critically apply content knowledge to real world situations and tasks.
  2. Students will demonstrate professional responsibility and ethical behavior relevant to the field of athletic training.
  3. Students will demonstrate competency and clinical proficiency in the five domains of athletic training.
  4. Students will secure appropriate employment in Athletic Training or a related field, or gain admission to a graduate program of study.
  5. The AT Program will provide high quality didactic and clinical instruction and learning opportunities to the students.
Athletic Training Program Objectives
  1. Students will demonstrate effective clinical application of athletic training skills learned in didactic coursework.
  2. Students will demonstrate adherence to the core foundational behaviors and professional attributes of health care providers.
  3. The annual 1st time pass rate for the BOC examination for Castleton students will be at least 10% above the national average.
  4. Annual assessment of program graduates will reveal at least 90% of our graduates secure appropriate employment in AT or a related field, or gain admission to a graduate program of study.
  5. The AT Program will continually assess didactic and clinical education instruction and opportunities.

Complete the following courses (74 cr):

(Note that some courses also fulfill General Education requirements)

Code Course Credits

AHS 1010

Contemporary Health Issues

Exploration of the aspects of life that have a great impact on your health, in order to develop the decision making skills needed to make intelligent, informed health care choices throughout life.

Fall

3

AHS 2151

Evaluation and Management of Injuries to the Lower Extremity

An investigation into the anatomy, injury mechanism, evaluation and management of orthopedic injuries to the lower extremity. The student will learn the cognitive and psycho motor process involved in both on field and clinical evaluations of sport related injuries. Advanced management procedures will be included.

Prerequisite: AHS 2160

Fall

3

AHS 2152

Evaluation and Management of Injuries to the Upper Extremity

An investigation into the anatomy, injury mechanism, evaluation and management of orthopedic injuries to the upper extremity. The student will learn the cognitive and psycho motor processes involved in both on field and clinical evaluations of sport related injuries. Advanced management procedures will be included.

Prerequisite: Advanced standing (accepted into the Athletic Training Education Program), or permission of instructor.

Spring

3

AHS 2160

Anatomical Aspects of Sports Medicine

This course will investigate the structure and function of the gross anatomy involved in athletic injuries and sports medicine. Topics include: joint structure and biomechanics, tissues, articulations, supportive and connective tissue arrangement, skeletal and neurological systems.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011

Spring

3

AHS 2170

Strength Training Principles

Strength Training Principles is a course designed to develop the student’s knowledge in the techniques and theories of strength training. Focus will be on proper lifting technique and safety. Secondary attention will be devoted to designing strength-training programs. This is an activity class and participation is mandatory.

Every semester

2

AHS 2510

Therapeutic Interventions I

This is a first course of a two-semester course sequence that studies therapeutic interventions as it relates to orthopedic injuries. This course follows a lecture/lab format combining the theoretical with hands-on experience. A study of inflammation, pain theories, and tissue healing is included. This course investigates application of therapeutic modalities (ice, heat, electronic stimulation, ultrasound,laser, and intermittent compression) and implementation of a comprehensive rehabilitation program that restores normal function.

Prerequisite: AHS 2151

Spring

3

AHS 2821

Athletic Training Clinical I

This course enables the student to work one-on-one with a preceptor in order to demonstrate proficiency in various athletic training skills. These skills have been learned and practiced in prior coursework. When demonstrating a clinical proficiency, the student must analyze a problem, consider the facts at hand, and make decisions about the appropriate course of action. In this clinical course the student will be responsible for demonstrating proficiency in lower extremity evaluations and emergency care of the injured athlete. In addition, the student will complete a field experience assignment and participate in an on-line journal forum to meet the requirements of this course.

Prerequisite: AHS 2151 and PED 2160

Fee Fee $50

Spring

2

AHS 2840

Practicum in Athletic Training

This course will focus on the topics of selection and fitting of protective equipment, recognition and management of environmental injuries and illnesses, and psychosocial intervention and referral in athletics training. Students will also attend the annual athletic training preseason camp, and complete a practical field experience in an athletic training clinical setting.

Prerequisite: Students must be formally accepted into the Athletic Training Education Program

Fee Fee $50

Fall

2

AHS 3120

Kinesiology

This course is designed to present information concerning the study of human movement. The primary emphasis is on the investigation of the mechanics of movement in order to provide the student with an ability to analyze and correct physical skills and movement patterns. In addition, laboratory sessions are designed to enhance the understanding of the topics covered in lecture.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012

Every semester

3

AHS 3140

Administration of Athletic Training and Sports Medicine Programs

This course investigates the planning, coordination and supervision of all administrative components of an athletic training and sports medicine program. Topics to be considered include basic legal concepts in sports medicine, medical/allied health care personnel and referral procedures, safety standards and policies, basic record and forms pertaining to the management of athletic injuries, computer application in sports medicine, drug testing and screening, budget preparation and financial management, athletic training room management, personnel management, ethical and public relations.

Prerequisite: Advanced standing (accepted into the Athletic Training Program).

Fall, odd years

3

AHS 3150

Physiology of Exercise

An examination of the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, renal, endocrine and environmental physiology, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized and applied to laboratory activities.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 and BIO 2012

Fee Fee $50

Every semester

4

AHS 3510

Therapeutic Interventions II

This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence that studies therapeutic interventions as it relates to orthopedic injuries. This course follows a lecture/lab format combining the theoretical with hands on experience. This course continues the discussion of therapeutic interventions (modalities and rehabilitation) and includes specific scenario based comprehensive applications. Also included is a study of surgical techniques and the therapeutic interventions used following surgery.

Prerequisite: AHS 2510 and AHS 2151 or AHS 2152

Fall

3

AHS 3811

Evaluation and Management of Injuries to the Head, Neck, and Trunk

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills in the evaluation and management of injuries to the head, neck, and trunk. The student will demonstrate proficiency in various cognitive and psychomotor skills that an entry-level athletic trainer must possess in order to evaluate injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity and to determine proper care, referring the client to other health care providers when appropriate.

Prerequisite: AHS 2151 or AHS 2152, or permission of instructor.

Spring

2

AHS 3813

Pharmacology and General Medical Conditions

This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level athletic trainer must possess in pharmacologic applications relevant to the treatment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity. In addition, the student will learn to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity.

Prerequisite: AHS 2510 or permission of instructor.

Fall

2

AHS 3822

Athletic Training Clinical II

This course enables the student to work one-on-one with a Preceptor in order to demonstrate proficiency in various athletic training skills. These skills have been learned and practiced in prior coursework. In this clinical course the student will be responsible for demonstrating proficiency in the comprehensive clinical examination and management of patients with upper extremity injuries. The student will create and implement therapeutic interventions for upper and lower extremity injuries. In addition, the student will attend the annual athletic training preseason camp, complete a field experience assignment, participate in an on-line journal forum, and pass the Level II Program Competency Exam.

Prerequisite: AHS 2152 and AHS 2157

Fee Course fee $50

Fall

2

AHS 3823

Athletic Training Clinical III

This course enables the student to work one-on-one with a preceptor in order to demonstrate proficiency in various athletic training skills. These skills have been learned and practiced in prior coursework. When demonstrating a clinical proficiency, the student must analyze a problem, consider the facts at hand, and make decisions about the appropriate course of action. In this clinical course the student will be responsible for demonstrating proficiency in therapeutic modalities and psycho-social aspects of physical activity. In addition, the student will complete a field experience assignment and participate in an on-line journal forum to meet the requirements of this course.

Prerequisite: AHS 3510 and PED 2120

Fee Fee $50

Spring

2

AHS 4160

Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription

This course is designed as a practical study of current fitness testing protocols used in various fitness and clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on preparation, administration, and evaluation of various graded exercise testing protocols. In addition, students will gain experience in the area of exercise prescription for various populations based on the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines.

Lecture and lab.

Restrictions Restrictions: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, and Health Science Majors Only.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 and AHS 4250 or permission of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

AHS 4620

Senior Seminar in Athletic Training

This final culminating course will prepare senior students in the athletic training education program for the BOC examination. Resume writing, public speaking and other professional preparation activities will be included.

Prerequisite: Advanced standing in the Athletic Training Education Program.

Fee Lab Fee $30.

Fall

2

AHS 4824

Athletic Training Clinical IV

This course enables the student to work one-on-one with a Preceptor in order to demonstrate proficiency in various athletic training clinical integration skills. These skills have been learned and practiced in prior coursework. In this clinical course the student will be responsible for demonstrating proficiency in design, implementation, evaluation, and modification of exercise and wellness programs. Proficiency in the evaluation and management of injuries to the head, neck and trunk will be assessed. In addition, the student will attend the annual athletic training preseason camp, complete a field experience exercise assignment and participate in an on-line journal forum.

Prerequisite: AHS 1010, AHS 2170, AHS 3811, and PED 4020, or permission of instructor.

Fee Fee $50

Fall

2

AHS 4825

Athletic Training Clinical V

This course enables the student to work one-on-one with a preceptor in order to demonstrate proficiency in various athletic training skills. These skills have been learned and practiced in prior coursework. When demonstrating a clinical proficiency, the student must analyze a problem, consider the facts at hand, and make decisions about the appropriate course of action. In this clinical course the student will be responsible for demonstrating proficiency in the use of standard protective equipment to prevent or minimize athletic injuries, evaluation and management of environmental illnesses, and recognition and treatment of common general medical conditions. During this clinical, the student will demonstrate proper utilization of patient files. In addition, the student will complete a field experience assignment and participate in an on-line journal discussion board to meet the requirements of this course.

Prerequisite: AHS 3140 and AHS 3813 or permission of instructor.

Fee Fee $50

Spring

2

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

PED 2120

Psycho-Social Aspects of Physical Activity

Examines the psychological and sociological frameworks of sport and physical activity for participants at all levels. Includes topics such as motivation, performance enhancement, group dynamics, aggression and socio-cultural influences.

Every semester

3

PED 2160

Emergency Care and Personal Safety

Emergency Care is an American Red Cross Emergency Response Course based on the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 1995 First Responder: National Standards Curriculum. This course will provide the participant essential information for developing the functional first aid capabilities of a first responder. As a crucial link in the EMS system, first responders evaluate and treat patients until more advanced medical help can arrive. This course does not provide state licensure for ambulance personnel.

Fee Fee $15.

Every semester

3

PED 4020

Applied Nutrition and Weight Control

Principles of human nutrition, the metabolism of nutrients during rest and exercise modes; the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and vitamins during rest and exercise; the role of exercise in the energy balance system for weight control; a study of various fad diets for weight control; and the concepts of overweight and obesity will be studied. An individualized project will be included.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

PED 4910

Senior Thesis

*Courses requiring minimum grade of B-

The course is designed to introduce students to research writing and research development in sports medicine including exercise science and athletic training. The formulation of a research proposal will be the primary emphasis. In addition, students present their proposals orally and in poster format.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

Every semester

3

Note:

Prior to graduation, students must show competency in swimming.

The following courses are strongly recommended:

Code Course Credits

BIO 3240

Advanced Human Physiology

This course will examine selected aspects of human physiology in health and disease, including the activity of nerves and muscles, circulation, respiration, metabolism, and water and electrolyte balance. Intended for students who have completed the Human Anatomy and Physiology sequence and wish to explore these topics in more detail.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011, BIO 2012, and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHE 1041, or CHE 1051.

Fall, even years

3

CHE 1041

General Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include modern atomic theory and structure of atoms, chemical bonds, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry and molecular geometry. To succeed in this course, an understanding of applied algebra is necessary.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1221 or MAT 1320, or equivalent placement.

Fee Fee $50.

Fall

4

CHE 1042

General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHE 1041. Topics include solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction reactions and acid-base chemistry.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in CHE 1041 or CHE 1051

Fee $50 lab fee

Spring

4

PHY 1051

General Physics I

An introduction to the concepts and theories of physics. Topics include forces, motion and energy. A weekly laboratory section explores concepts and the role of experimentation in science. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2110 or equivalent.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific & Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

PHY 1052

General Physics II

A continuation of PHY 1051. Topics include electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2210.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: PHY 1051

Fee Lab fee $50

4

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Click here for General Education Requirements.