School Health Education Program Requirements

The Department of Health, Human Movement, & Sport offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Health Education (BS.HED). Health educators assist individuals and communities in promoting positive health behaviors. They have specialized skills in planning, implementing and evaluating community programs that focus on a variety of negative health issues.

Students completing the baccalaureate degree in Health Education will demonstrate:

  • The ability to organize, develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive health education program (Pre-K-12) that includes the following Vermont health core concept areas: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs; Family, Social, and Sexual Health; Mental and Emotional Health; Nutrition and Physical Activity; Personal Health and Wellness; and Violence and Injury Prevention.
  • The ability to develop and implement an assessment plan consistent with national and/state standards.
  • The ability to develop accommodations for a health education program to meet the needs of all individuals. This includes an understanding of applicable laws, policies, and procedures.

BS in Health Education with a Concentration in School Health Education

The concentration in School Health Education prepares students for Vermont Agency of Education Level I Teacher Licensure in Health Education PreK-12. The concentration offers field experiences in local schools that focus on the skill, knowledge, and understanding necessary to be successful in contemporary educational settings. The department is strongly committed to a standards-based approach with high expectations for students' effort, achievement, and behavior.

Students completing this program are expected to demonstrate skills, including, but not limited to:

  1. The ability to organize, develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive health education program (pre K-12 curriculum) that includes the following Vermont health core concept areas: alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; family, social, and sexual health; mental and emotional health; nutrition and physical activity; personal health and wellness; and violence and injury prevention.
  2. The ability to develop and implement an assessment plan consistent with national and state standards.
  3. The ability to develop accommodations for a health education program to meet the needs of all individuals. This includes an understanding of applicable laws, policies, and procedures.

Complete these courses required of all Health Education majors (42 cr):

Code Course Credits

AHS 1010

Contemporary Health Issues

Exploration of the aspects of life that have a great impact on your health, in order to develop the decision making skills needed to make intelligent, informed health care choices throughout life.

Fall

3

AHS 2150

Designs for Fitness

This course investigates the basic components of fitness. Topics include: fitness assessment testing, individualized exercise prescriptions, team conditioning programs, risk factor analysis and chronic disease prevention, behavior modification, nutrition and weight control, body composition analysis, hydration and heat illness prevention, physiological effects of training and overtraining.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fee Fee $15

Every semester

3

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

HED 2330

Drug and Alcohol Curriculum

This course will examine the issues of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, specifically the physiological, psychological, and sociological effects of substance use and abuse on the individual, family, and society. The course will also consider legal issues, and curriculum and teaching strategies for effective substance abuse prevention.

Prerequisite: HED 2310 or permission of instructor.

Spring, odd years

2

HED 2350

Sexual Health Curriculum

This course will examine the issues of family health and comprehensive sexuality education in public schools, specifically the issues of human growth and development, families, relationships, reproductive health, abstinence, premature sexual activity, contraceptives, adolescent pregnancy, childbirth, adoption, abortion, and HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. This course will also consider legal issues, and curriculum and teaching strategies for effective comprehensive sexuality education.

Spring, odd years.

2

HED 3030

Health Behavior Theory

This course examines health behavior theories. Health behavior is the product of individual, interpersonal, community, societal, and cultural influences. Health educators are committed to finding the best ways to improve health behavior outcomes. The use of health behavior theory can guide the search for why people do or do not adopt healthy lifestyles, and be used to predict and improve health outcomes. In this course, you will learn why health behavior theory is a necessary first step in developing health education programs and how to use theory to strengthen health education practices.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Fall

3

PED 1015

Introduction to Health and Physical Education

This course is an introduction to the profession of physical education and health education. Discussion of physical education and health education history, philosophy and ethics, career opportunities, recreation, and athletics are included.

Fall

3

PED 2160

Emergency Care and Personal Safety

Emergency Care is an American Red Cross Emergency Response Course based on the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 1995 First Responder: National Standards Curriculum. This course will provide the participant essential information for developing the functional first aid capabilities of a first responder. As a crucial link in the EMS system, first responders evaluate and treat patients until more advanced medical help can arrive. This course does not provide state licensure for ambulance personnel.

Fee Fee $15.

Every semester

3

PED 2370

Community Health

A study of current community and world health issues to include an overview of epidemiology, communicable disease, environmental health, health services and consumerism.

Spring

3

PED 4020

Applied Nutrition and Weight Control

Principles of human nutrition, the metabolism of nutrients during rest and exercise modes; the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and vitamins during rest and exercise; the role of exercise in the energy balance system for weight control; a study of various fad diets for weight control; and the concepts of overweight and obesity will be studied. An individualized project will be included.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

SWK 2020

Family Violence

Analyzes the psychosocial dynamics of families disrupted by domestic violence. Aspects of child abuse, spouse abuse and elder abuse will be covered. Differential social work assessment and intervention will be emphasized.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every Semester

3

PED 2120

Psycho-Social Aspects of Physical Activity

And take one of the following:

Examines the psychological and sociological frameworks of sport and physical activity for participants at all levels. Includes topics such as motivation, performance enhancement, group dynamics, aggression and socio-cultural influences.

Every semester

3

PED 3040

Psychological Aspects of Exercise

And take one of the following:

This course will review theories and models about physical activity, exercise and fitness behavior from a psychological perspective. Class discussion will center on topics such as: exercise motivation, physical activity and mental health, physical self-perception, determinants of physical activity, adherence to exercise, interventions, and reinforcement of healthy behavior, e.g., self-confidence, self-efficacy. Emphasis will be placed on exercise psychology from a behavioral medicine perspective and on exercise behaviors of people of all ages with a range in physical activity experience.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 3265

Child and Adolescent Development

This course surveys the major areas of the psychology of child and adolescent development, emphasizing an understanding of the important methods, terms, theories, and findings in the field of child development.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

and complete these courses for the School Health Education concentration (28 cr):

Code Course Credits

EDU 2110

Introduction to Exceptional Populations

This course is a study of history, philosophy, and current practices relating to education of children and young adults with special needs: the culturally different, visually handicapped, deaf and hearing impaired, learning impaired, emotionally disabled, intellectually gifted, physically handicapped, and learning disabled. The course also includes an overview of Public Law 94-142 and its implication for the inclusion of youngsters into regular classroom environments.

Spring

3

HED 2310

Health Education Methods

This course examines comprehensive school health education and the research and theory of health behavior. Course content includes the following: the historical development and philosophy of health education; knowledge of health education concepts and skills delineated in current national and Vermont health education standards, laws and regulations; the impact of societal values, norms and priorities on health education practice; the process of selecting and using current, valid and reliable sources of health information, to include national, state, and local organizations/associations, publications and educational materials/resources; and analyzing research relative to health risks among school-age youth and translating research into recommendations for the design and implementation of health education programs. This course also explores the purposes, components and approaches to coordinating school health initiatives based on the national Coordinated School Health model, including partnerships with families, school staff, and community members to improve health literacy and health behaviors.

Prerequisite: PED 2420, or permission of the instructor.

Spring

3

PED 2420

Foundations of Teaching Health and Physical Education

This course gives students the opportunity to discover the science and art of teaching. Students, through a field-based experience, observe and reflect upon the act of learning in physical education and/or health education at the elementary,and/or secondary levels. Included is a study of the historical, social, and philosophical foundations of contemporary education and an examination of current educational trends and programs. Areas of study include professionalism, school laws, governance of schools, equitable learning, school problems, basic teaching strategies, development of an educational philosophy, and an introduction to state and national standards for students and teachers. Students will complete a minimum of 20 hours in a supervised classroom setting that involves direct observation and participation. A law enforcement background check completed at the student's expense may be required. Personal transportation is required.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in PED 1015.

Fee Fee $15

3

HED 3010

Elementary Health Education Curriculum & Assessment

This course examines elementary standards-based Health Education curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Students explore the process of planning an effective, age-appropriate school health curriculum that aligns with the Vermont Health Education standards including developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and uses multiple assessment techniques. Students also learn about applying diverse innovative instructional strategies that align with standards-based learner outcomes and performance indicators; implementing skill building strategies to develop competency in health related skills; and selecting, designing and utilizing multiple assessment techniques. The process of Health Education program evaluation is also be discussed.

Prerequisite: PED 2420, HED 2310 (Health Education Methods), or permission of the Instructor.

Fall

3

HED 3020

Secondary Health Education Curriculum & Assessment

This course examines secondary standards-based Health Education curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Students explore the process of planning an effective, age-appropriate school health curriculum that aligns with the Vermont Health Education standards including developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and uses multiple assessment techniques. Students also learn about applying diverse innovative instructional strategies that align with standards-based learner outcomes and performance indicators; implementing skill building strategies to develop competency in health related skills; and selecting, designing and utilizing multiple assessment techniques. The process of Health Education program evaluation is also be discussed

Prerequisite: PED 2420. HED 2310 (Health Education methods), or permission of the Instructor.

Spring

3

HED 4510

Seminar in Teaching Health Education

This seminar prepares the student for the student teaching experience, supports the student during the experience, and introduces or reviews competencies associated with the role of the professional educator. Preparation of the teacher licensure portfolio is emphasized.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to Health Student Teaching

Every semester

1

HED 4801

Directed Student Teaching in Health Education I

This course is an opportunity for the student to teach under the guidance of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Students seeking teacher licensure in preK-12 Health Education must apply, qualify, and be admitted to student teaching.

Prerequisite: Complete all required major courses, meet required GPA standard, departmental recommendation, and professional and related intellectual competencies as stated in written application requirements.

Every semester

6

HED 4802

Directed Student Teaching in Health Education II

This course is an opportunity for the student to teach under the guidance of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Students seeking teacher licensure in K-12 Health Education must apply, qualify, and be admitted to student teaching.

Prerequisite: Complete all required major courses, meet required GPA standard, departmental recommendation, and professional and related intellectual competencies as stated in written application requirements.

6

(Total health education credits required for BS.HED.ESE: 70 cr)

Students seeking licensure

Students seeking licensure are responsible for developing a portfolio throughout their undergraduate experience demonstrating individual learning and growth as well as the ways in which the individual course work and field experiences foster proficiency in meeting the Vermont standards for teacher preparation. Integral field experiences ensure that the student becomes part of a collaborative relationship in a school setting. Field experiences become more complex as students advance in the program, culminating in a semester-long student teaching experience. A minimum of 80 scheduled hours of field experience is required prior to student teaching.

Students seeking the BS.HED.ESE must pass through Gateways I and II in order to qualify for student teaching.

Requirements for Gateway I include:

  • Receive a positive recommendation encouraging continuation in the program;
  • Earn a cumulative GPA of 2.75;
  • Earn a minimum within the major GPA of 2.75;
  • Make progress towards completion of the General Education Program;
  • Submit electronic portfolio evidence completed in PED 2420 and HED 2310 that demonstrates progress in the student's understanding of an effective teaching and learning environment and evidence of a commitment to one's personal development as a future professional;
  • Pass the Praxis Core Academic Skills Test for Educators or meet the alternative SAT score requirements.

Following completion of Gateway I, emphasis will be on completing the requirements of the school health education major track as well as honing pedagogical expertise in the field and classroom. Prospective teacher candidates will also continue to build their electronic portfolios documenting an understanding of the central connections between content and pedagogy.

Requirements for Gateway II include:

  • Complete the department's application to student teach the semester before enrolling in student teaching;
  • Pass the first portion of their electronic portfolio, which includes evidence indicated by the Department of Health, Human Movement, & Sport;
  • Have completed all health education major and general education coursework or obtain permission from the Teacher Education Program Coordinator
  • Earn a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and earn a GPA of 3.0 within the health education major or written certification of intellectual competence by an Academic Dean;
  • Receive a recommendation from members of the faculty to continue in the teacher education program.
  • Through related coursework, complete a minimum of 80 hours of supervised field experience;
  • Pass the ETS Praxis II examination in Health Education content knowledge.

Upon completion of Health Education Gateway II, students may be accepted into the student teaching practicum.

Teacher Licensure (preK-12):

To be recommended for licensure by the State of Vermont, a student must:

  • Successfully complete and graduate from an approved program.
  • Receive a grade of "B" or better in Student Teaching I and Student Teaching II and a "pass" in HED 4510.
  • Maintain a GPA of 3.0 and a B average (GPA of 3.0) in the field of major studies.
  • Meet the required standard for the licensure portfolio.
  • Exemplify in conduct and attitude the maturity, judgment, ethical standards, and dedication expected in the teaching profession.
  • Pass the Praxis II examination in health education content knowledge.

Students wishing to work towards teacher licensure in preK-12 Health Education must apply and be accepted into Health Education Gateway II.

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Click here for General Education Requirements.