Health Science Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

For further information about this major, contact Dr. Justin Carlstrom, the Health Science Coordinator: justin.carlstrom@castleton.edu

An interdisciplinary program designed to prepare students for entry into professional programs in health related fields, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant.

Students completing the Bachelor of Science in Health Science will demonstrate:

  • Mastery of factual knowledge and understanding of processes related to the structure and function of the human body, including the mechanisms and treatment of disease or injury.
  • Ability to locate, comprehend, and evaluate information related to human biology, health, and medicine.
  • Ability to communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  • Adherence to laboratory protocols and ability to collect data using the scientific method.
  • Understanding of the nature of their chosen profession, including ethics and standards of professional conduct, through an internship experience.

Complete the following courses as part of the Gen Ed core requirement (9 cr):

Code Course Credits

MAT 2021

Statistics I

This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010.

Every semester

3

PSY 1012

Introduction to Psychological Science

A survey of a wide variety of topics studied by psychological scientists. The course objective is to introduce students to the terms, concepts and methods of psychological science.

Restrictions This course is equivalent to Introduction to Psychology; students will not receive credit for both courses.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

SOC 1010

Introduction to Sociology

-OR- SOC 1030 - Social Problems 3 cr

A systematic introduction to the study of social behavior and social organization. The major conceptual tools of sociology are used to explore the structure, processes, and content of social action; to provide insight into the regularity and diversity of human social behavior.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

And complete the following science courses (25-27 cr):

Code Course Credits

CHE 1041

General Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include modern atomic theory and structure of atoms, chemical bonds, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry and molecular geometry. To succeed in this course, an understanding of applied algebra is necessary.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1221 or MAT 1320, or equivalent placement.

Fee Fee $50.

Fall

4

CHE 1042

General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHE 1041. Topics include solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction reactions and acid-base chemistry.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in CHE 1041 or CHE 1051

Fee $50 lab fee

Spring

4

PHY 1051

General Physics I

An introduction to the concepts and theories of physics. Topics include forces, motion and energy. A weekly laboratory section explores concepts and the role of experimentation in science. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2110 or equivalent.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific & Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

PHY 1052

General Physics II

A continuation of PHY 1051. Topics include electricity, magnetism, Optics, and waves. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2210.

Lecture and lab

Prerequisite: PHY 1051

Fee Lab fee $50

4

AHS 2810

Internship in Health Science

See Internships. Signed contract is required at time of registration.

Restrictions BS.HLT majors only.

Every semester

1-3

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

And complete at least 24 credits from the following courses:

At least 3 credits must be selected from each of the four areas.

A. Allied Health and Physical Education

Code Course Credits

AHS 2160

Anatomical Aspects of Sports Medicine

This course will investigate the structure and function of the gross anatomy involved in athletic injuries and sports medicine. Topics include: joint structure and biomechanics, tissues, articulations, supportive and connective tissue arrangement, skeletal and neurological systems.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011

Spring

3

AHS 2161

Introduction to Myofascial Release

This course is an introduction to the body's complex and fascinating fascia system, and the massage techniques that bring about the release of fascial restrictions. The student will learn to provide massages with advanced methods of relieving chronic tension and pain, and restoring full motion in the body.

Restrictions Health Science, Athletic Training and Kinesiology majors only.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011

Every semester

3

AHS 2420

Foundations of Orthopedic Assessment

This introductory orthopedic assessment course investigates the anatomy, injury mechanism, evaluation and management of common orthopedic injuries to the lower and upper extremities. The student will learn the cognitive and psychomotor process involved in both on field and clinical evaluations of sport related injuries.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: AHS 2160

Every semester

3

AHS 3090

Introduction to Alternative/Complementary Medicine

The purpose of this course is to introduce the learner to the theory and practice of the most widely used complementary and alternative therapies. Such as, but not limited to: “alternative” medical systems, mind/body treatment approaches, bodywork, and dietary supplements. This course will focus on informing the participants and future practitioners [which may include all appropriate majors] about these systems, treatment approaches/therapies, and supplementation methods, thus empowering participants to include these options, where appropriate, into the decision making process related to attaining and maintaining high level wellness for themselves and their future clients.

Periodically

3

AHS 3120

Kinesiology

This course is designed to present information concerning the study of human movement. The primary emphasis is on the investigation of the mechanics of movement in order to provide the student with an ability to analyze and correct physical skills and movement patterns. In addition, laboratory sessions are designed to enhance the understanding of the topics covered in lecture.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012

Every semester

3

AHS 3210

Foundations of Therapeutic Interventions

This introductory therapeutic interventions course investigates thermal modalities (ice and heat) and comprehensive rehabilitation techniques as it relates to common orthopedic injuries. This course follows a lecture/lab format combining the theoretical with hands-on experience. A study of inflammation and tissue healing is included.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: AHS 2160; AHS 2420 recommended

Every semester

3

AHS 3813

Pharmacology and General Medical Conditions

This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level athletic trainer must possess in pharmacologic applications relevant to the treatment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity. In addition, the student will learn to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity.

Prerequisite: AHS 2510 or permission of instructor.

Fall

2

AHS 4160

Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription

This course is designed as a practical study of current fitness testing protocols used in various fitness and clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on preparation, administration, and evaluation of various graded exercise testing protocols. In addition, students will gain experience in the area of exercise prescription for various populations based on the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines.

Lecture and lab.

Restrictions Restrictions: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, and Health Science Majors Only.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 and AHS 4250 or permission of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

PED 4020

Applied Nutrition and Weight Control

Principles of human nutrition, the metabolism of nutrients during rest and exercise modes; the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and vitamins during rest and exercise; the role of exercise in the energy balance system for weight control; a study of various fad diets for weight control; and the concepts of overweight and obesity will be studied. An individualized project will be included.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

B. Psychology

Code Course Credits

PSY 2170

Drugs and Behavior

An inquiry into the natural functioning of the brain's neurotransmitters and the impact of psychoactive drugs on mood, behavior, cognition, and perception. The major classes of recreational drugs such as stimulants, depressants, opiates, and psychedelics will be explored along with the major classes of medicinal drugs such as anti-psychotics, anti-depressants, and anxiolytics.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

PSY 3060

Child Psychopathology

An analysis of theory, research, and therapy of psychological disorders of children, including early infantile autism, neurophysiological developmental problems, learning difficulties, developmental retardation, juvenile delinquency, and psycho-physiological disorders.

Fall

3

PSY 3070

Abnormal Psychology

The description and classification of deviant behaviors. The continuity between normal and varying degrees of maladjustment is stressed.

Every semester

3

PSY 3130

Health Psychology

Examination of the biopsychosocial model of health and disease. Topics will include: overviews of behavioral interventions and biofeedback, stress and stress management, pain and pain management, cancer, asthma, weight control and obesity, eating disorders and adherence to medical regimens.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

PSY 3265

Child and Adolescent Development

This course surveys the major areas of the psychology of child and adolescent development, emphasizing an understanding of the important methods, terms, theories, and findings in the field of child development.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

PSY 3410

Biopsychology

Biopsychology is the study of behavior as driven by the biology of the brain and the structure of the nervous system. Two main objectives of the course are: 1) to appreciate the complexity of sensory capabilities and abilities such as memory, judgment, coordination, and planning, and 2) to gain awareness of the spectrum of brain diseases and consequences of traumatic brain injury.

Every semester

3

PSY 4050

Nature and Nurture

This course engages the student in the classic Nature versus Nurture debate in developmental psychology. Students will read classic and contemporary texts and evaluate the relative importance of genetics and environment in the development of children.

Spring, odd years.

3

C. Science

Code Course Credits

AHS 3150

Physiology of Exercise

An examination of the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, renal, endocrine and environmental physiology, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized and applied to laboratory activities.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 and BIO 2012

Fee Fee $50

Every semester

4

AHS 4152

Pathophysiology and Clinical Exercise Physiology

This course concentrates on the pathophysiology of selected diseases and the role of exercise. The diseases covered include cardiac, pulmonary, immune, metabolic, neuromuscular, and renal diseases. This information is important for those students who have an interest in clinical exercise physiology.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150/BIO 3151

Fall, odd years

3

BIO 2010

Cell and Molecular Biology

This course provides science majors with the fundamentals of cell and molecular biology. Students study the basics of molecular biology, the flow of genetic information through the cell, its structure, function, metabolism, and regulation. The lab portion of the course will focus on mastery of standard cell and molecular biology techniques while exploring course concepts. This course is intended for science majors and minors only and will not satisfy the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding frame of reference.

Lecture and Lab

Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 1121 and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051 with a "C" or better.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

BIO 2125

Fundamentals of Microbiology

A study of the cellular structure and function of microorganisms, principally bacteria. The physiology, genetics, and interactions of bacteria with higher forms of life and the environment will be covered. The required laboratory will provide students with an understanding and practical knowledge of aseptic techniques and other common microbiology methods.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122 , or BIO 2011 and BIO 2012.

Fee Lab fee $50

Every Semester

4

BIO 3070

Genetics

A survey of the major fields of genetics with a focus on modern molecular genetics and genetic technologies. A weekly discussion and exploration period examines problem-solving strategies and hand-on applications of modern genetic technologies.

Prerequisite: BIO 2010 (may be taken concurrently) or BIO 2125, and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051.

Spring

4

BIO 3210

Developmental Biology

This course is an examination of the patterns of animal development, including the production of sex cells, fertilization, and the growth and maturation of the embryo. The relationship between development and the evolution of species will be considered. Students will explore embryological development in a variety of animals, including normal and abnormal human development.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122, or BIO 2011 and BIO 2012 (BIO 2012 may be taken concurrently).

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring, even years

4

BIO 3240

Advanced Human Physiology

This course will examine selected aspects of human physiology in health and disease, including the activity of nerves and muscles, circulation, respiration, metabolism, and water and electrolyte balance. Intended for students who have completed the Human Anatomy and Physiology sequence and wish to explore these topics in more detail.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011, BIO 2012, and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHE 1041, or CHE 1051.

Fall, even years

3

CHE 2111

Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds. Emphasis is on organic functional groups and their chemical properties, nomenclature and molecular structure. The laboratory introduces students to basic organic laboratory techniques of synthesis, purification and characterization. Lecture (3 hrs.) and lab (4 hrs). Students are strongly recommended to take Organic Problem Solving I (CHE 2113) together with this course.

Prerequisite: CHE 1042 or CHE 1052 with a grade of C or better.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

CHE 2112

Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHE 2111. Continued study of organic functional groups and their chemical properties and molecular structures. Emphasis is on reaction mechanisms, aromaticity and spectroscopic methods od analysis of organic molecules. Students are strongly recommended to take Organic Problem Solving II ( CHE 2114 ) together with this course.

Lecture (3 hrs) and lab (4 hrs).

Prerequisite: CHE 2111

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

CHE 3011

Biochemistry I

This course provides an introduction to the major classes of biological molecules and their structure, function and metabolism in living systems. Students examine the structure of proteins, their function and their binding to other molecules. Enzymes and their kinetics and mechanisms are covered in detail. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of chemistry and the living world of biology.

Lecture

Prerequisite: CHE 2111 with a grade of "C" or better. CHE 2112 is strongly recommended.

Fall

4

D. Contemporary Health Issues

Code Course Credits

HED 2010

Current Health Issues

Exploration of the aspects of life that have a great impact on your health, in order to develop the decision making skills needed to make intelligent, informed health care choices throughout life. Examines the concept of health and the role and responsibility of individuals for their health. Emphasizes wellness and health promotion and their relationship to the quality of life.

Every semester

3

PED 2370

Community Health

A study of current community and world health issues to include an overview of epidemiology, communicable disease, environmental health, health services and consumerism.

Spring

3

PED 3060

Women’s Health Issues

This course will explore and analyze current Women’s Health Issues. Topics to be considered are: research; and or lack of research related to issues in women’s health, medical ethics and women’s health; reproductive technology, human sexuality, family planning, euthanasia, consumer health, the right to life, battered women and battered women’s syndrome, politics and poverty in women’s health issues, the relation of health issues to social issues, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse and alcoholism, nutrition and weight control, emotional health, mental illness, women and ecology, adoption of preventive health behavior, and social change patterns in areas of concern to women’s health.

Spring

3

PHI 3020

Medical Ethics

This course is a study of current ethical problems in medicine and health care. Topics include ethical problems about the doctor-patient relationship, problems at the end of life, the beginning of life, and problems concerning the health care system. Specific issues to be discussed may include abortion, euthanasia, new reproductive technologies, the rights and responsibilities of patients, doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals, and justice and the health care system.

This course fulfills either the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference or the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

SOC 3070

Medical Sociology

A critical analysis of health, illness, and mental health, environmental and occupational health care systems, the health care work force, social movements, and social change in the field of health and mental health care.

Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

SOC 2230

Death And Dying

An examination of death and dying from the cross-cultural, social, historical, familial and personal perspectives. An emphasis is given to the cultural beliefs and behaviors and the social approaches of understanding and coping with death and dying.

Periodically

3

SWK 2130

Introduction to the Study of Aging

A critical theoretical approach to the study of aging. A life span developmental perspective will frame issues on aging. Students will gain an understanding of the sociological, psychological, biological, and political aspects of aging. Application of knowledge for helping professionals will be emphasized through an interdisciplinary framework.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

(Credits required for the major: 58-60 cr)

Pharmacy Degree (CU/ACPHS 3+4)

This major participates in the 3+4 program with Albany School of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, in which highly-focused students can earn a Bachelor's degree in just three years at CU and a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) in four years at ACPHS.

For details, see the Pharmacy Degree page.