Agency Psychology Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outline the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

BA in Psychology with a Concentration in Agency

This concentration is designed for students who are interested in developing their psychology knowledge and skills by getting involved in the local community as professional social scientists. This concentration produces graduates who are generally skilled in conscientiousness, communication, leadership, and teamwork-skills highly valued by most employers, inside and outside the field of psychology. Students interested in acquiring the skills and experience that can only come from hands-on practice are encouraged to concentrate in this area. Experiences provided in this concentration are powerful evidence of a student's preparation for graduate study or employment. In addition, this concentration provides an excellent foundation for the Certificate in Civic Engagement.

Students intending to concentrate in Agency must apply in writing to the Psychological Sciences Department Chairperson for acceptance.

Note that all required psychology courses must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or better.

Complete the following courses required of all Psychology majors (23 cr):

Code Course Credits

PSY 1012

Introduction to Psychological Science

A survey of a wide variety of topics studied by psychological scientists. The course objective is to introduce students to the terms, concepts and methods of psychological science.

Restrictions This course is equivalent to Introduction to Psychology; students will not receive credit for both courses.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 3010

Theories of Personality

Examination of individual differences in human behavior. Heavy emphasis is placed on research findings pertaining to the learning, experiential and cognitive factors contributing to personality development.

Every semester

3

PSY 3040

Cognitive Psychology

Examines research on topics central to cognitive science: perception, attention, memory, thought and language. A cognitive lab will provide hands-on demonstrations of important experiments in cognitive psychology.

Every semester

3

PSY 3151

Psychological Research I

Introduction to the scientific method as applied to behavior. Emphasis is on the development of scientific attitudes as well as the development of the basic research skills of data collection, analysis and interpretation. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Psychology majors.

Prerequisite: PSY 1012.

Spring

4

PSY 3152

Psychological Research II

Fosters further development of scientific attitudes and research skills. Student research conducted in PSY 3151 is refined and prepared for publication. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Psychology majors.

Prerequisite: PSY 3151.

Fall

4

PSY 3410

Biopsychology

Biopsychology is the study of behavior as driven by the biology of the brain and the structure of the nervous system. Two main objectives of the course are: 1) to appreciate the complexity of sensory capabilities and abilities such as memory, judgment, coordination, and planning, and 2) to gain awareness of the spectrum of brain diseases and consequences of traumatic brain injury.

Every semester

3

and complete these courses for the Concentration in Agency (18 cr):

Code Course Credits

PSY 2210

Applied Behavior Analysis I

This is a service-learning course. As such, students will learn the content of the course while engaged in service in local schools. The course examines the principles of operant, respondent, and social learning. Emphasis is directed at the application of these principles toward classroom management, behavior change, and self-control.

Fall

3

PSY 2212

Applied Behavior Analysis II

This is a service-learning course that extends the development of students’ knowledge of modern learning theory through application of this theory in local schools. Students increase understanding of course content as they provide service in the community.

Spring

3

PSY 3820

Psychology Proctorship

Psychology proctors assume responsibility, under supervision, for the progress of students in psychology courses at various levels or serve as a laboratory assistant in an upper level psychology course.

Prerequisite: Permission of the department coordinator of proctorship.

3

PSY 4421

Psychology Practicum I

In this course students will operationalize acquired skills, principles, and concepts in psychology and education. Students will function in a professional capacity in the delivery of psychological services in a public school setting under the supervision of a certified school psychologist in the state of Vermont. Students will be involved in assessment, consultation, and intervention activities, with the primary target population being school-aged children. Students must commit to participation over two semesters and complete both Psychology Practicum I and II.

Prerequisite: PSY 4020 , and permission of instructor

Fall

3

PSY 4422

Psychology Practicum II

  • One 3-credit Civic Engagement course from outside the Psychological Sciences Department 3 cr

This course is a continuation of Psychology Practicum I in which students operationalize acquired skills, principles, and concepts in psychology and education. Students will function in a professional capacity in the delivery of psychological services in a public school setting under the supervision of a certified school psychologist in the state of Vermont. Students will be involved in assessment, consultation, and intervention activities, with the primary target being school-aged children. Students must commit to participation over two semesters and complete both Psychology Practicum I and II.

Prerequisite: PSY 4421 and permission of the instructor

Spring

3

(Credits required for the major: 41 cr)

The following courses are recommended for this concentration:

Code Course Credits

PSY 2040

Social Psychology

Scientific study of interpersonal behavior. Topics typically discussed are attitude change and social influence, aggression and violence, impression formation, group processes, conformity and attraction.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

PSY 4810

Internship in Psychology

Permission required. Signed contract required at time of registration.

1-12

Agency concentration students are encouraged to earn the Certificate of Civic Engagement

Read about the Certificate of Civic Engagement.

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Review the Gen Ed requirements.

Code Course Credits

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Note: These Gen Ed courses are strongly recommended:

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

MAT 2021

Statistics I

This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010.

Every semester

3

MAT 2022

Statistics II

This course is a continuation of MAT 2021 and includes estimation, hypothesis testing, single linear regression, and one-way analysis of variance using calculators and statistical software. This course addresses in-depth such topics as the Central Limit Theorem, Chebyshev's theorem, covariance, multiple regression, ANOVA, nonparametric methods, and applications of probability distributions. It includes problems dealing with multiple linear regression, multi-way analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, enumerative data, and computer applications. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 2021

Every semester

3