Health Psychology Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outline the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

BA in Psychology with a Concentration in Health Psychology

This concentration is designed for students who have a particular interest in the connections between psychology and health issues. Students who aspire to careers in behavioral medicine, public health, health promotion, epidemiology, clinical health psychology, counseling, allied health fields, or other human service areas are encouraged to follow the guidelines with respect to the required and recommended courses.

Note that all required psychology courses must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or better.

Complete the following courses required of all Psychology majors (23 cr):

Code Course Credits

PSY 1012

Introduction to Psychological Science

A survey of a wide variety of topics studied by psychological scientists. The course objective is to introduce students to the terms, concepts and methods of psychological science.

Restrictions This course is equivalent to Introduction to Psychology; students will not receive credit for both courses.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 3010

Theories of Personality

Examination of individual differences in human behavior. Heavy emphasis is placed on research findings pertaining to the learning, experiential and cognitive factors contributing to personality development.

Every semester

3

PSY 3040

Cognitive Psychology

Examines research on topics central to cognitive science: perception, attention, memory, thought and language. A cognitive lab will provide hands-on demonstrations of important experiments in cognitive psychology.

Every semester

3

PSY 3151

Psychological Research I

Introduction to the scientific method as applied to behavior. Emphasis is on the development of scientific attitudes as well as the development of the basic research skills of data collection, analysis and interpretation. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Psychology majors.

Prerequisite: PSY 1012.

Spring

4

PSY 3152

Psychological Research II

Fosters further development of scientific attitudes and research skills. Student research conducted in PSY 3151 is refined and prepared for publication. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Psychology majors.

Prerequisite: PSY 3151.

Fall

4

PSY 3410

Biopsychology

Biopsychology is the study of behavior as driven by the biology of the brain and the structure of the nervous system. Two main objectives of the course are: 1) to appreciate the complexity of sensory capabilities and abilities such as memory, judgment, coordination, and planning, and 2) to gain awareness of the spectrum of brain diseases and consequences of traumatic brain injury.

Every semester

3

and complete these courses for the Concentration in Health Psychology (15 cr):

Code Course Credits

PSY 2170

Drugs and Behavior

Complete these four courses:

An inquiry into the natural functioning of the brain's neurotransmitters and the impact of psychoactive drugs on mood, behavior, cognition, and perception. The major classes of recreational drugs such as stimulants, depressants, opiates, and psychedelics will be explored along with the major classes of medicinal drugs such as anti-psychotics, anti-depressants, and anxiolytics.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

PSY 2280

Positive Psychology

This course explores the meaning of work and play in people's lives from the standpoint of positive psychology. This subfield of psychology focuses on helping people understand and enhance their strengths and virtues so that they may lead fulfilling lives. Rather than the traditional psychological emphasis on mental health problems, positive psychology is about helping normal people become happier, more productive, and cultivate optimism. We explore the values people hold for work and play, while considering the challenges and rewards of "the good life."

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

PSY 3070

Abnormal Psychology

The description and classification of deviant behaviors. The continuity between normal and varying degrees of maladjustment is stressed.

Every semester

3

PSY 3130

Health Psychology

Examination of the biopsychosocial model of health and disease. Topics will include: overviews of behavioral interventions and biofeedback, stress and stress management, pain and pain management, cancer, asthma, weight control and obesity, eating disorders and adherence to medical regimens.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

PSY 4020

Psychological Testing

and complete at least one of these courses:

Introduction to the theory, development and utility of psychological testing with emphasis on the administration and interpretation of intelligence tests.

Prerequisite: Basic course in Statistics or consent of the instructor.

Spring

3

PSY 4320

Advanced Research

  • a 4000-level seminar with related content approved by the Chair (e.g. a special topic such as Eating Disorders, Addictions, or Chronic Illness and Disabilities)

This course is designed for students who would like to conduct an intensive research project under the close supervision and guidance of the psychology faculty. Students will be responsible for data collection, analysis, interpretation, and oral presentation at a national or regional research conference.

Spring

3

(Credits required for the major: 38 cr)

The following courses are recommended for this Concentration:

Code Course Credits

AHS 3150

Physiology of Exercise

An examination of the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, renal, endocrine and environmental physiology, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized and applied to laboratory activities.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 and BIO 2012

Fee Fee $50

Every semester

4

PED 4020

Applied Nutrition and Weight Control

Principles of human nutrition, the metabolism of nutrients during rest and exercise modes; the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and vitamins during rest and exercise; the role of exercise in the energy balance system for weight control; a study of various fad diets for weight control; and the concepts of overweight and obesity will be studied. An individualized project will be included.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

PHI 3020

Medical Ethics

This course is a study of current ethical problems in medicine and health care. Topics include ethical problems about the doctor-patient relationship, problems at the end of life, the beginning of life, and problems concerning the health care system. Specific issues to be discussed may include abortion, euthanasia, new reproductive technologies, the rights and responsibilities of patients, doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals, and justice and the health care system.

This course fulfills either the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference or the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Review the Gen Ed requirements.

Code Course Credits

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Note: These Gen Ed courses are strongly recommended:

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

MAT 2021

Statistics I

This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010.

Every semester

3

MAT 2022

Statistics II

This course is a continuation of MAT 2021 and includes estimation, hypothesis testing, single linear regression, and one-way analysis of variance using calculators and statistical software. This course addresses in-depth such topics as the Central Limit Theorem, Chebyshev's theorem, covariance, multiple regression, ANOVA, nonparametric methods, and applications of probability distributions. It includes problems dealing with multiple linear regression, multi-way analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, enumerative data, and computer applications. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 2021

Every semester

3