Energy and Climate as Disciplinary Core Ideas

Course Number: EDU 5627 C09 (Graduate)
Instructor: Deanna Bailey
Location: Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee, VT
Dates and Times: June 25-29, 2018
Credits: 3 graduate credits
Tuition: $1,550

Note: Housing is available at a reduced rate through Lake Morey Resort. Please register directly with VEEP. If you wish to take the course for credit, please notify VEEP, who will then give you the link to the Castleton online registration form.

Course Description

Energy and Climate as Disciplinary Core Ideas is a professional development opportunity for teachers of grades K-12 with the goal of helping teachers develop the foundation for teaching energy and climate in their classrooms. The course integrates energy and climate literacy within the context of the Next Generation Science Standards, project-based learning, and school communities. Using the three-dimensional learning of NGSS as the pedagogical foundation, teachers explore the science core ideas of Human Impacts on Earth Systems, Natural Resources, Global Climate Change, and Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer. In addition, teachers are supported and challenged to apply this content to energy and climate project-based learning opportunities for students that build global citizenship and transferable skills. Hands-on exploration, discussion with experts, field trips, and collaboration time for curriculum creation allow teachers to develop additional strategies and learning opportunities to engage their students in applying energy knowledge in meaningful ways that support the shift from “learning about” to “figuring out.” There are separate tracks for teachers of grades K-5, 6-8 and 9-12, to differentiate for the varying and diverse needs of different grade levels

Course Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize and explain how energy and climate literacy fit within the context of NGSS, project-based learning, and school communities.
  • Develop standards-based, grade-appropriate energy and climate lessons/units to use within their classrooms.
  • Feel more confident and comfortable with energy and climate disciplinary core ideas. 
  • Select and use appropriate energy science equipment and technical tools to enhance lessons.
  • Compare and contrast energy and climate issues/policies on local, national, and global levels.

Course Expectations 

Attendance Expectations

Participants are expected to attend all five days of the summer training and to contribute to all aspects of the course, including informal dialogue, presentations, work time/supported time and both large and small group discussions.

Required excerpts, chapters, or full text of:

  • Committee on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards, Education, B. O., Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Council, N. R., Quinn, H., Schweingruber, H., & Keller, T. (2012). A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. National Academies Press.
  • Two to four scholarly, peer-reviewed readings of their choosing on science instruction, implementation of NGSS, hands-on learning, or related topics.

Recommended Readings and Other Resources - 

  • Vermont Comprehensive Energy Plan. 2016 Vermont Comprehensive Energy Plan. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2016, from publicservice.vermont.gov/sites/psd/files/Pubs_Plans_Reports/State_Plans/Comp_Energy_Plan/2015/2016CEP_ES_Final.pdf 
  • Energy Literacy – U.S. Department of Energy. 2012 Energy Literacy: Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts for Energy Education. Retrieved March 15, 2016, from energy.gov/eere/education/energy-literacy-essential _ principles-and-fundamental-concepts-energy-education
  • Community Energy Dashboard. The Energy Action Network (EAN) has created a Community Energy Dashboard to enable communities to understand their energy use and make clean energy choices and investments across all energy sectors: electric, thermal, and transportation. The Dashboard makes energy use across all three sectors visible and understandable to consumers and communities as a whole. The goal is to inform, educate, and engage Vermont communities in energy use, leading to action and documenting impacts. www.vtenergydashboard.org

VEEP-Developed Curricula and Kit Materials:

  • Electricity, Renewables, and Climate Change (ERC)- Explore it all! ERC combines components of various workshops and curricula developed and used by VEEP in classrooms throughout Vermont. Here we’ve redesigned and updated it for NGSS - offering anchoring, investigative, everyday phenomena to help you engage students in learning big energy ideas by practicing science. Supporting lesson ideas and questions are sequenced in a suggested storyline to help you dig deeper with students into their in-the-moment questions and interests. This all-encompassing teacher resource can be used in any coherent order and format to help students unpack and make meaning of the many engaging phenomena.
  • Solar and Wind FUNdamentals. Introduce your youngest students to the wind and solar! VEEP has designed an introductory unit on wind and solar for K–3 that incorporates engineering principles in engaging, hands-on lessons, using NGSS and Common Core as frameworks. With a focus on being an engineer, students will build, share, and redesign models to understand how we can effectively use wind and solar.
  • Wind Works. Hold on to your notebooks! Large fans and demonstration wind turbines unite to create electricity and present the power potential of wind. Students take measurements of wind speed with handheld anemometers and measure the voltage output on specially designed wind turbines. Students then graph the resulting data to explore the relationship between wind speed and power and evaluate wind power as an energy alternative here in Vermont.
  • Solar Challenge. Challenge your students to build a collector to boil water with energy from the sun. Students go to engineering school, learn about collector design, and parabolas through hands-on experiments. Student teams design and build solar collectors and compete for prizes in several categories. Materials kit for Solar Challenge includes reflective Mylar, cardboard, and mini-collector patterns.
  • PVs In Action. Turn your students into solar energy experts. Materials kit includes mini PV panels, motors, and lights (just in case!): everything you need to demonstrate solar power right in the classroom. PVs In Action Curriculum guide has lessons that build on each other.
  • Modeling of Climate Science. How do human activities affect Earth systems? Help your students develop their understanding of factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century with the emphasis on the major role that human activities play. Students ask questions, build models, and engage in investigations and then apply this knowledge to help minimize the risks of climate change.

Required Texts

Required excerpts, chapters, or full text of:

  • Committee on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards, Education, B. O., Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Council, N. R., Quinn, H., Schweingruber, H., & Keller, T. (2012). A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. National Academies Press.
  • Two to four scholarly, peer-reviewed readings of their choosing on science instruction, implementation of NGSS, hands-on learning, or related topics.

Other Information Not Listed Above 

Summer Institute Week

  • Day One: Climate and Next Generation Science Standards: This first day sets the stage and provides context for our learning. We will study the climate components of the Next Generation Science Standards and learn from a Dartmouth College guest speaker. As we focus on the disciplinary core ideas of Global Climate Change and Human Impact on Earth Systems, we will consider what it really means to be able to use these scientific ideas.
  • Day Two: Energy and Renewables: All teachers will participate in a general discussion about energy and renewables and then depending on grade level will explore grade-appropriate curriculum and lessons. A field trip to a local renewable facility will end the day. 
  • Day Three: Policy, Projects, and Action: During this day teachers will hear about what is happening at local, national, and global levels regarding energy and climate policies. Project-based learning will be explored through different tracks such as Efficiency in Lighting and Plug load and elementary engineering wind turbine design projects. We will end the day by outlining how to plan NGSS aligned classroom curricula.
  • Day Four: Using Content to Make a Difference: Personalized and Project-Based learning will be further explored. Participants will investigate using wind, solar, and hydro curricular kits and resources; or climate and electricity kit and resources (depending on grade level). This day ends with curriculum development time with guided support from VEEP staff.
  • Day Five: Energy and Climate in Your Classroom: Teachers will have time to collaborate and work on developing energy and climate curricula with guided support from VEEP staff. 

Assessment

A minimum of 45 hours of professional development that includes

  • 1-2 hours of reading 2-4 scholarly, peer-reviewed articles on science instruction, the implementation of NGSS, hands-on learning, or related topics, with the addition of facilitating a discussion with the class. 
  • 2-5 hours of close reading the K-12 Science Framework and identifying key points to aid in the development of an energy unit. 
  • 35-40 hours of energy inquiries and investigations during the summer institute week.

Percentage Contribution of Each Assignment

  • A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practice, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (10%). Participants will close read sections on the core disciplinary ideas of Global Climate Change, Human Impacts on Earth Systems, and Energy Conservation and Transfer. 
  • Peer Reviewed Articles (10%). Prior to the summer session, participants will locate and read 2-4 scholarly, peer-reviewed articles on science instruction, implementation of NGSS, hands-on learning, or related topic. They will be responsible for facilitating a discussion with the class. 
  • Summer Institute Energy Inquiries and Investigations (80%). During the summer session, participants will complete energy inquiries and investigations, each of which will be documented through the use of a science/engineer notebook. This will be a place to organize observations and data, analyze data and maintain a record of learning for future reference. Participants are expected to contribute to all aspects of the course including informal dialogue, presentations, work time/supported time and both large and small group discussions. Each teacher will develop and share a unit sequence at the end of the week.

For additional course information

Deanna Bailey
(802) 552-8674

For additional registration information

Cara Robecheck
(802) 552-8674

Register online now!