Environmental Studies Minor Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

The Environmental Studies minor is offered by the HGEP Department. Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to demonstrate their ability to live, work and participate in a diverse natural world where differences in perspective, the product of democratic politics, are to be expected.

Complete the following courses (12 cr):

Code Course Credits

ENV 1015

Introduction to Environmental Studies

This course provides a framework for understanding relationships between people and the environment. Employing methods and perspectives from the humanities and social sciences, we consider subjects including definitions of nature, conservation, and preservation, the regulation of common resources, climate change and other environmental problems, and impacts of population, affluence and poverty, urbanization, and technology on the environment.

This course fulfills the Social & Behavioral frame of reference.

Fall, odd years

3

GEO 3050

Conservation, Planning, and the Environment

This course considers the interactions of people and environments in political and geographical contexts. Through reading, writing, discussion, research, and experiential learning, students will study the impacts of human development on nature and the role of state and local government agencies in balancing economic growth with the need to protect local environments.

Spring, even years

3

PHI 3160

Environmental Ethics

This course is a survey of ethical issues involving humans and the natural environment. Central problems are: Of what moral value is, or what moral responsibilities do humans have toward, the natural world? Animals? Future generations? Are the ethical issues at odds with economic issues? Current ethical theories or movements to be studied include the Land Ethic, Deep Ecology, Biocentrism, and Ecofeminism.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring, even years

3

POS 2310

Environmental Politics

This course will analyze various aspects of environmental policy making in both the U.S. and internationally. It will begin with various philosophical and ideological perspectives concerning the relationship between man and nature. There will be consideration of how environmental issues interact with various other types of societal goals, particularly economic prosperity, security and freedom. The class will study aspects of the environmental policy process and its outcomes in the U.S. by the use of a number of case studies relevant to particular policy problems (including air and water pollution; biological engineering; and energy). It will also be a consideration of the international regimes to deal with these issues, and the relationship between environmental and economic development issues.

Fall, odd years

3

Plus 6 additional credits of related work, subject to approval of the coordinator.

Possible courses include, but are not limited to the following:

Code Course Credits

ANT 2210

Anthropology and the Environment

This course explores the interface between culture and the natural environment from a cultural ecological perspective. Through cross-cultural comparisons, with an emphasis on the contrasts between small-scale and large-scale societies, it examines human relationships with nature. Particular attention is given to the effects subsistence practices, economics, politics, and globalization have on a culture's changing attitudes about and behaviors toward the environment.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

ECO 1050

Building Sustainable Prosperity

The economic path we are now on is environmentally unsustainable. But we do not have to choose between a sustainable environment and prosperity. We used to believe that we did, and we used to think that humans inevitably harmed the environment. We now know that the opposite is true. More and more we are learning that it is possible for humans to live and prosper in harmony with nature. To accomplish this, economies don't have to grow less; they have to grow very differently. Ecologically sound economies are possible - if we decide to create them and learn how. Change is necessary, difficult, possible and very exciting. This course will explore the many possibilities available, with many well under way. As this is a Civic Engagement course, the exploration will be facilitated both by readings and by students' engagement in the local community.

This course fulfills the Social & Behavioral Frame of Reference.

Spring, odd years

3

ECO 3060

Political Economy of the Environment

How do we have both a healthy environment and a healthy economy? The goal of this class is to examine the intersections of economic and ecological systems in a social and political context, and to help students develop an understanding of the controversies around the analytical and policy frameworks now evolving which may or may not help to solve some pressing environmental problems. In particular, students will learn to use the tools of economic analysis, both neoclassical and alternative, to provide perspective to the issues. They can expect to gain insight into the complexity of the political and economic issues surrounding the environmental and environmental justice movements. Finally, students can expect to gain insight into the debates around growth and sustainability.

Prerequisite: any Economics course is highly recommended, but not required.

Spring, odd years

3

ENV 1210

Environmental Harm and Mitigation Strategies

This course examines the problems in the interactions between human society and our natural environment. It is an introductory exploration of the pressures and correctives which our society places on all our life-sustaining ecosystems, while at the same time being utterly dependent on them. We will examine the depth and scope of the problems, the development of protective policies, and the variety of views on how best to proceed, at local, state, national, and global levels. Simultaneously, we will gain some hands-on experience at the local level with our service-learning work with the local community. A full understanding of the scope of environmental harm we are now facing can be very discouraging, so the course will also focus on the myriad ways, large and small, that we can and already do work to overcome the harm.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

ENV 2910

Independent Study

By arrangement with the coordinator of Environmental Studies. Signed contract required at time of registration.

1-3

ENV 3810

Internship in Environmental Studies

By arrangement with the coordinator of Environmental Studies. Signed contract required at time of registration.

1-12

ENV 4910

Independent Study

A student-faculty contract determines content. Intended for students wishing to study upper-level Environmental Studies content not otherwise available or to carry out research in the field of Environmental Studies. Signed contract required at time of registration. By arrangement with instructor, environmental studies coordinator, and department chair.

1-3

GEO 2220

Weather and Climate

This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of meteorology and climatology. Students will investigate earth-sun relationships, air-mass formation and movement, wind, fronts, severe storms, cloud formation and identification, cyclogenesis and pressure systems, precipitation, global circulation patterns, atmospheric pollution, and global climate change.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

(Total credits required: 18)