Kinesiology/Pre-AT B.S. Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

Athletic trainers (ATs) are highly qualified, multi-skilled health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to provide preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. To become an AT, one must first graduate from a CAATE accredited professional athletic training education program that results in the granting of a master's degree in athletic training.

This 3+2 program allows students to complete the entire bachelor's and master's degree program in five years, and be eligible to take the Board of Certification Examination (BOC) upon program completion. Students in the Kinesiology/Pre-AT program complete MS.ATR prerequisite courses in biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, anatomy and physiology. They also complete courses that provide foundational knowledge in athletic training.

Students will apply to the MS.ATR program using the Athletic Training Centralized Application Service (ATCAS) by February 1st of their third year. Acceptance into the MS.ATR program is limited, and merely completing the application process does not guarantee admission. More information about the application process and selection criteria can be found at CU's Athletic Training website.

The fourth and fifth years are dedicated to the MS.ATR didactic and clinical coursework. Students receive a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology/Pre-AT degree after the fourth year. The MS.ATR program takes two full years, including two summer (August) semesters, to complete. The design of the new masters degree program allows students to become immersed in athletic training didactic and clinical content courses because the foundational knowledge and general education courses will be complete before students enter the MS.ATR program. The MS.ATR curriculum sequence can be viewed at at CU's Athletic Training website.

ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Athletic Training Program at Castleton University is to provide a comprehensive and progressive academic and clinical education experience for students. This experience at Castleton prepares students to pass the Board of Certification (BOC) examination and achieve entry-level employment in the field of Athletic Training.

The AT Program accepts the overall mission of Castleton University to provide the opportunity for intellectual and personal growth of students through excellence in teaching, close student-faculty interaction, numerous opportunities for outside-the-classroom learning, and an active and supportive campus community. The AT Program strives to prepare students for meaningful careers, further academic pursuits; and engaged, environmentally responsible citizenship.

ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM GOALS

The AT Program prepares students to:

1. Think critically and effectively apply content knowledge to real world situations and tasks.

  • Be professionally and ethically responsible administrators of athletic healthcare.
  • Maintain the highest standards of evidence-based clinical practice by effectively integrating information technology, clinical expertise, and patient values and circumstances.
  • Utilize effective oral and written communication skills as an athletic trainer.
  • Secure employment in athletic training or a related field, or gain admission to a graduate program of study.

2. The AT Program continually strives to provide high quality didactic and clinical instruction and learning opportunities for the students.

Required courses (65 cr)

Code Course Credits

AHS 1310

Foundations of Athletic Training

This introductory athletic training course investigates the educational and professional requirements necessary to become a Certified Athletic Trainer. Topics of discussion include: evidence based practice in athletic training, the roles and responsibilities of athletic trainers in different work settings, the history and structure of the National Athletic Trainers Association, requirements to sit for the Board of Certification examination, and the Castleton University Athletic Training Program Requirements. Observation of Castleton University athletic trainers is a required component of this course. The course also includes a practical study of the application of athletic taping and wrapping techniques.

Lecture and lab.

Fee Fee $35

Spring

3

AHS 2160

Anatomical Aspects of Sports Medicine

This course will investigate the structure and function of the gross anatomy involved in athletic injuries and sports medicine. Topics include: joint structure and biomechanics, tissues, articulations, supportive and connective tissue arrangement, skeletal and neurological systems.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011

Spring

3

AHS 2161

Introduction to Myofascial Release

This course is an introduction to the body's complex and fascinating fascia system, and the massage techniques that bring about the release of fascial restrictions. The student will learn to provide massages with advanced methods of relieving chronic tension and pain, and restoring full motion in the body.

Restrictions Health Science, Athletic Training and Kinesiology majors only.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011

Every semester

3

AHS 2170

Strength Training Principles

Strength Training Principles is a course designed to develop the student’s knowledge in the techniques and theories of strength training. Focus will be on proper lifting technique and safety. Secondary attention will be devoted to designing strength-training programs. This is an activity class and participation is mandatory.

Every semester

2

AHS 2420

Foundations of Orthopedic Assessment

This introductory orthopedic assessment course investigates the anatomy, injury mechanism, evaluation and management of common orthopedic injuries to the lower and upper extremities. The student will learn the cognitive and psychomotor process involved in both on field and clinical evaluations of sport related injuries.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: AHS 2160

Every semester

3

AHS 3120

Kinesiology

This course is designed to present information concerning the study of human movement. The primary emphasis is on the investigation of the mechanics of movement in order to provide the student with an ability to analyze and correct physical skills and movement patterns. In addition, laboratory sessions are designed to enhance the understanding of the topics covered in lecture.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012

Every semester

3

AHS 3150

Physiology of Exercise

An examination of the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, renal, endocrine and environmental physiology, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized and applied to laboratory activities.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 and BIO 2012

Fee Fee $50

Every semester

4

AHS 3210

Foundations of Therapeutic Interventions

This introductory therapeutic interventions course investigates thermal modalities (ice and heat) and comprehensive rehabilitation techniques as it relates to common orthopedic injuries. This course follows a lecture/lab format combining the theoretical with hands-on experience. A study of inflammation and tissue healing is included.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: AHS 2160; AHS 2420 recommended

Every semester

3

BIO 1121

Biology I

A comprehensive introduction to biology focused on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. The course provides an introduction to all areas of biology.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: One year of high school biology and chemistry.

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

CHE 1041

General Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include modern atomic theory and structure of atoms, chemical bonds, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry and molecular geometry. To succeed in this course, an understanding of applied algebra is necessary.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1221 or MAT 1320, or equivalent placement.

Fee Fee $50.

Fall

4

HED 2010

Current Health Issues

Exploration of the aspects of life that have a great impact on your health, in order to develop the decision making skills needed to make intelligent, informed health care choices throughout life. Examines the concept of health and the role and responsibility of individuals for their health. Emphasizes wellness and health promotion and their relationship to the quality of life.

Every semester

3

MAT 2021

Statistics I

This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010.

Every semester

3

PED 2160

Emergency Care and Personal Safety

Emergency Care is an American Red Cross Emergency Response Course based on the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 1995 First Responder: National Standards Curriculum. This course will provide the participant essential information for developing the functional first aid capabilities of a first responder. As a crucial link in the EMS system, first responders evaluate and treat patients until more advanced medical help can arrive. This course does not provide state licensure for ambulance personnel.

Fee Fee $15.

Every semester

3

PED 2370

Community Health

A study of current community and world health issues to include an overview of epidemiology, communicable disease, environmental health, health services and consumerism.

Spring

3

PED 4020

Applied Nutrition and Weight Control

Principles of human nutrition, the metabolism of nutrients during rest and exercise modes; the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and vitamins during rest and exercise; the role of exercise in the energy balance system for weight control; a study of various fad diets for weight control; and the concepts of overweight and obesity will be studied. An individualized project will be included.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

PHY 1051

General Physics I

An introduction to the concepts and theories of physics. Topics include forces, motion and energy. A weekly laboratory section explores concepts and the role of experimentation in science. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2110 or equivalent.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific & Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

PSY 1012

Introduction to Psychological Science

A survey of a wide variety of topics studied by psychological scientists. The course objective is to introduce students to the terms, concepts and methods of psychological science.

Restrictions This course is equivalent to Introduction to Psychology; students will not receive credit for both courses.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

SOC 1010

Introduction to Sociology

-OR- SOC 1030 - Social Problems 3 cr

A systematic introduction to the study of social behavior and social organization. The major conceptual tools of sociology are used to explore the structure, processes, and content of social action; to provide insight into the regularity and diversity of human social behavior.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

Non-MS.ATR Option (12 cr)

Students who do not enter the MS.ATR program after the three-year mark will have the option to complete an alternate curriculum plan in the fourth year in order to fulfill the requirements of a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. The 4th year alternate plan for the BS in Kinesiology degree involves completing 12 credits from the following:

Complete an internship in Allied Health Science (1-3 cr)

And complete the remaining credits from these courses (9-11 cr)

Code Course Credits

AHS 4152

Pathophysiology and Clinical Exercise Physiology

Allied Health Science Category

This course concentrates on the pathophysiology of selected diseases and the role of exercise. The diseases covered include cardiac, pulmonary, immune, metabolic, neuromuscular, and renal diseases. This information is important for those students who have an interest in clinical exercise physiology.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150/BIO 3151

Fall, odd years

3

AHS 4160

Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription

This course is designed as a practical study of current fitness testing protocols used in various fitness and clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on preparation, administration, and evaluation of various graded exercise testing protocols. In addition, students will gain experience in the area of exercise prescription for various populations based on the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines.

Lecture and lab.

Restrictions Restrictions: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, and Health Science Majors Only.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 and AHS 4250 or permission of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

AHS 4170

Enhancement of Athletic Performance

This course focuses on the use of substances, programming, and recovery techniques that are used to improve athletic performance and adaptation to exercise. Focus will be given to both legal and illegal drugs, legal substances that are prohibited by organizations such as NCAA and WADA, and those substances that are both legal and allowed by the various athletic governing bodies.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150

Periodically

3

AHS 4220

Scientific Foundations of Strength and Conditioning I

This is the first part of a two course sequence. The content of the fall semester course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive review of muscle and cardiovascular physiology, biochemistry, and endocrinology related to the principles of strength training and conditioning. This course will also assist those students who desire to take the National Strength and Conditioning Association's Certified Strength and Conditioning (CSCS) exam.

Prerequisite: AHS 2170 and AHS 3150

Fall

3

AHS 4221

Scientific Foundations of Strength and Conditioning II

This is a continuation of AHS 4220. Emphasis will be placed on sport analysis, program design, and facility management. The final weeks of this course will be spent reviewing and preparing students to sit for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's Certified Strength and Conditioning (CSCS) exam.

Prerequisite: AHS 4220

Spring

3

AHS 4260

Nutrient Metabolism and Athletic Performance

The course focuses on the mechanisms of energy production and expenditure involved in cellular metabolism with a special emphasis on carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. Relationships between optimal nutrition and sports and exercise, thermoregulation and fluid balance, and ergogenic aids on physical performance will be covered.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051

Spring

3

PED 2072

Advanced Strength and Conditioning

Psychology/Sociology Category

This activity course is offered for individuals who have already achieved a high level of physical fitness but wish to participate in strength and conditioning activities to push themselves to an even higher level of fitness. The class will feature a variety of activities including speed and agility drills, strength training, circuits and cardiovascular training. It is recommended that each individual enter the course at a good level of fitness.

Fall (First Half of Semester), Spring (Second Half of Semester)

1

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 2170

Drugs and Behavior

An inquiry into the natural functioning of the brain's neurotransmitters and the impact of psychoactive drugs on mood, behavior, cognition, and perception. The major classes of recreational drugs such as stimulants, depressants, opiates, and psychedelics will be explored along with the major classes of medicinal drugs such as anti-psychotics, anti-depressants, and anxiolytics.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

PSY 3130

Health Psychology

Examination of the biopsychosocial model of health and disease. Topics will include: overviews of behavioral interventions and biofeedback, stress and stress management, pain and pain management, cancer, asthma, weight control and obesity, eating disorders and adherence to medical regimens.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

PSY 3410

Biopsychology

Biopsychology is the study of behavior as driven by the biology of the brain and the structure of the nervous system. Two main objectives of the course are: 1) to appreciate the complexity of sensory capabilities and abilities such as memory, judgment, coordination, and planning, and 2) to gain awareness of the spectrum of brain diseases and consequences of traumatic brain injury.

Every semester

3

PHI 3020

Medical Ethics

This course is a study of current ethical problems in medicine and health care. Topics include ethical problems about the doctor-patient relationship, problems at the end of life, the beginning of life, and problems concerning the health care system. Specific issues to be discussed may include abortion, euthanasia, new reproductive technologies, the rights and responsibilities of patients, doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals, and justice and the health care system.

This course fulfills either the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference or the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

SOC 3070

Medical Sociology

Science Category

A critical analysis of health, illness, and mental health, environmental and occupational health care systems, the health care work force, social movements, and social change in the field of health and mental health care.

Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

CHE 1042

General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHE 1041. Topics include solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction reactions and acid-base chemistry.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in CHE 1041 or CHE 1051

Fee $50 lab fee

Spring

4

CHE 2111

Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds. Emphasis is on organic functional groups and their chemical properties, nomenclature and molecular structure. The laboratory introduces students to basic organic laboratory techniques of synthesis, purification and characterization. Lecture (3 hrs.) and lab (4 hrs). Students are strongly recommended to take Organic Problem Solving I (CHE 2113) together with this course.

Prerequisite: CHE 1042 or CHE 1052 with a grade of C or better.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

PHY 1052

General Physics II

A continuation of PHY 1051. Topics include electricity, magnetism, Optics, and waves. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2210.

Lecture and lab

Prerequisite: PHY 1051

Fee Lab fee $50

4