Physical Education Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

The Department of Health, Human Movement, & Sport offers the degree in Physical Education with concentrations in elementary and secondary education (BS.PED.ESE) or Health and Physical Activity Promotion (BS.PED.HAP). The department makes a strong commitment towards a standards-based approach to the development of beginning educators.

The Department of Health, Human Movement, & Sport holds high expectations for their students' effort and behavior. As a result of this teacher educator program, students are expected to demonstrate a variety of goals, including, but not limited to;

  1. The ability to organize, develop, implement, and evaluate a physical education program (Pre-K-12 curriculum, athletic programs, health fitness programs)
  2. The recognition and incorporation of safety, risk management, and liability considerations in physical education programs.
  3. The ability to develop and implement an assessment plan consistent with national and/or state standards.
  4. The ability to develop accommodations for physical education program to meet the needs of all individuals. This includes an understanding of applicable laws, policies, and procedures.

In addition, each student choosing to become a teacher is responsible for developing a portfolio. The portfolio is constructed during all semesters of the undergraduate experience. The portfolio will demonstrate individual learning and growth as well as how the individual course work and field experiences work together to foster proficiency in meeting Vermont State regulations and standards for teacher preparation.

Courses within the department and at field experiences in local schools and community organizations focus on the skill, knowledge, and understanding necessary to be successful in contemporary educational settings. Field practical experiences are those in which the student becomes part of a collaborative relationship in a school and/or community setting. They are an integral part of the teacher education experience. The role of the student becomes more complex as students advance in their program, which culminates in a semester-long student teaching experience. A minimum of 80 scheduled hours of field experience is required prior to student teaching.

Physical Education Teacher Education students are introduced to theory and practice of physical education beginning in their first year of study within the teaching major. The electronic portfolio process will allow students to demonstrate and assess their process towards the goals of the physical education teacher education program.

Two beginning-level pedagogy courses, PED 2420 - Foundations of Teaching Health and Physical Education, and PED 2410 - Curriculum and Instruction in Physical Education incorporate the production of evidence indicated by the Level I Licensure Portfolio. Two intermediate level pedagogy courses, PED 3070 - Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education, and PED 3140 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education incorporate additional portfolio requirements.

Between the student's first year until the semester leading up to student teaching, gateways will be used to assess teacher candidate progress through the program. Upon successful completion of PED 2420 and PED 2410, students must satisfy the requirements of Physical Education Gateway I before proceeding with PED 3070 and PED 3140.

Requirements for Physical Education Gateway I include:

  • Receive a positive recommendation encouraging continuation in the program;
  • Earn a cumulative GPA of 2.75;
  • Earn a minimum within the major GPA of 2.75;
  • Complete a minimum of 14 credits of 2000 and/or 3000 level course work within the Physical Education core;
  • Make progress towards completion of the General Education Program;
  • Submit electronic portfolio evidence completed in PED 2420 and PED 2410 that demonstrates progress in the student's understanding of an effective teaching and learning environment, and evidence of a commitment to one's personal development as a future professional;
  • Pass the Praxis Core Academic Skills Test for Educators or meet the alternative requirements.

Following completion of Gateway I, the program's emphasis will be on completing the requirements of the physical education major as well as honing pedagogical expertise in the field as well as the classroom. The Methods of Elementary Physical Education and the Methods of Secondary Physical Education courses will provide students with the opportunity to gain additional learning experiences using field-based inquiry, reflection, and analysis. Prospective teacher candidate will also continue to build their electronic portfolios by providing evidence that documents their understanding of the central connections between content and pedagogy.

Upon completion of Physical Education Gateway II, students may be accepted into the student teaching practicum. These Gateway II benchmarks are as follows;

  • Complete the department's application to student teach the semester before enrolling in student teaching;
  • Pass the first portion of their electronic portfolio, which includes evidence indicated by the Department of Health, Human Movement, & Sport;
  • Have completed all physical education major and general education coursework; or, obtain permission from the Teacher Education Program Coordinator.
  • Earn a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and earn a GPA of 3.0 within the physical education major; or written certification of intellectual competence by an academic dean;
  • Receive a recommendation from members of the faculty to continue in the teacher education program.
  • Through related coursework, complete a minimum of 80 hours of supervise field experience.
  • Pass any additional teaching motor skills competency tests as required by the Department of Health, Human Movement, & Sport.
  • Pass the Praxis Core Academic Skills Test for Educators;
  • Pass the ETS Praxis II Physical Education content exam; if the student does not pass the Praxis II examination for physical education, the physical education program coordinator may permit the student to develop and submit a written plan outlining the strategies by which he or she intends to strengthen content area. This plan must be approved by the physical education program coordinator.

Complete the Physical Education core (57 cr):

Code Course Credits

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

complete one of these courses:

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 2110

Educational Psychology

An examination of the principles and theories of learning as they apply to the developmental changes of the child. Special emphasis will be placed on how the child learns and ways of producing optimal conditions for childhood learning.

Every semester

3

PSY 3265

Child and Adolescent Development

This course surveys the major areas of the psychology of child and adolescent development, emphasizing an understanding of the important methods, terms, theories, and findings in the field of child development.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

AHS 2150

Designs for Fitness

and complete all of these courses:

This course investigates the basic components of fitness. Topics include: fitness assessment testing, individualized exercise prescriptions, team conditioning programs, risk factor analysis and chronic disease prevention, behavior modification, nutrition and weight control, body composition analysis, hydration and heat illness prevention, physiological effects of training and overtraining.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fee Fee $15

Every semester

3

AHS 3150

Physiology of Exercise

An examination of the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, renal, endocrine and environmental physiology, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized and applied to laboratory activities.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 and BIO 2012

Fee Fee $50

Every semester

4

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

DAN 2020

Teaching Rhythms And Dance

This course provides students the opportunity to discover the science and art of teaching dance and rhythms. Outcomes for this course are aligned to physical education teacher education competencies, and both content knowledge and physical demonstration of skills will be assessed. This course requires a significant amount of physical activity.

Spring

2

OER 1211

Adventure Education – Low Elements

The Project Adventure Model-An interrelated and sequential approach to adventure education for the physical education class or any classroom environment. Students will learn cooperative warm ups, non-traditional games, trust activities, problem solving initiative, and will include involvement in a low ropes challenge course.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Fee Fee $15.

Spring

2

PED 1015

Introduction to Health and Physical Activity Promotion

This course is an introduction to health and physical activity promotion in society, communities and schools. Discussion of health and physical activity promotion history, philosophy and ethics, career opportunities, recreation, and athletics are included.

Fall

3

PED 1610

Concepts of Fitness and Skill Performance

The course emphasizes the development and assessment of fundamental motor skills and fitness levels in physical education candidates. Students are required to demonstrate competent (mature) skill levels and Health Fitness Zone levels on the Fitness Gram for successful completion of this course.

Fall

2

PED 2010

Beginning Swimming

This course will focus on developing a variety of competencies required for proficient swimming, including body position, stroke technique, floating, treading water, and breathing. In addition, students will learn how to teach basic swimming skills with specific attention to instructional methods and safety considerations. Required physical education majors' swim exam will be administered in this course.

Fall (First Half of Semester), Spring (Second Half of Semester)

1

PED 2160

Emergency Care and Personal Safety

Emergency Care is an American Red Cross Emergency Response Course based on the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 1995 First Responder: National Standards Curriculum. This course will provide the participant essential information for developing the functional first aid capabilities of a first responder. As a crucial link in the EMS system, first responders evaluate and treat patients until more advanced medical help can arrive. This course does not provide state licensure for ambulance personnel.

Fee Fee $15.

Every semester

3

PED 2260

Gymnastics/Stunts and Tumbling

Fall (Second Half of Semester)

1

PED 2310

Technology for Health and Physical Education

This course will provide to students the technology competencies expected of 21st century educators, and specifically the technology skills required in the fields of physical education and health education. Students will learn how to apply what they experience in this course to both their future teaching and to the production of their electronic licensure portfolio. Students are encouraged to supply their own iPad and/or laptop.

Restrictions Physical or Health Education majors

Spring

3

PED 2320

Motor Learning

This course is designed to present information concerning the fundamental principles and concepts in the acquisition and refinement of motor skills/abilities. The learning and performance of motor skills become cornerstones from which concepts, processes, and strategies are built. The course provides the students with a basic understanding of the discipline and to provide experiences that will enhance their understanding and application of motor learning in a variety of environments. Laboratory sessions are designed to enhance the understanding of the topics covered in lecture.

Periodically

3

PED 2410

Curriculum and Instruction in Physical Education

Examines the physical education curriculum at the elementary and secondary levels; emphasizes strategies for planning effective instruction; explores teaching and learning styles; analyzes effective behavior management; and examines safety and liability.

Prerequisite: PED 1015 and PED 2420.

Periodically

3

PED 2420

Foundations of Teaching Health and Physical Education

This course gives students the opportunity to discover the science and art of teaching. Students, through a field-based experience, observe and reflect upon the act of learning in physical education and/or health education at the elementary,and/or secondary levels. Included is a study of the historical, social, and philosophical foundations of contemporary education and an examination of current educational trends and programs. Areas of study include professionalism, school laws, governance of schools, equitable learning, school problems, basic teaching strategies, development of an educational philosophy, and an introduction to state and national standards for students and teachers. Students will complete a minimum of 20 hours in a supervised classroom setting that involves direct observation and participation. A law enforcement background check completed at the student's expense may be required. Personal transportation is required.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in PED 1015.

Fee Fee $15

3

PED 3110

Adapted Physical Education

Examines inclusion of children with disabilities in the physical education class. P.L. 94-142 and other legal mandates will be a major focus of the course. A practicum experience outside of class is included.

Prerequisite: PED 2410 or and PED 2420 or permission of the instructor.

Spring

3

PED 3135

Teaching Individual Sport Skills

This course presents the teaching and analysis of motor skill performance using several individual sport skills. Students will learn and apply the principles of planning, progression, lesson organization, and the application of various teaching approaches to the following activities, including but not limited to: snowshoeing, bowling, geo-caching, First Tee youth golf, and tennis. Four off-campus meetings required for bowling and golf activities.

Prerequisite: PED 2410

Fee Fee $30.00

Spring

3

PED 3220

Teaching Net and Racquet Sports

This course presents the teaching and analysis of racquet, net, and wall games. Students will learn and apply the principles of lesson organization, assessment of motor skills, and the application of various teaching approaches. Emphasis will be placed on planning and applying developmentally appropriate activities for all learners.

Prerequisite: PED 2410

Periodically

3

PED 3320

Teaching Team Motor Skills

This course presents the teaching and analysis of motor skill performance using several sport and game topics. Students will learn and apply the principles of planning, progression, extension, refinement, lesson organization, and the application of tactics and strategy to team play.

Prerequisite: PED 2410

Fall

3

PED 4030

Organization and Administration of Physical Education

*indicates prerequisite course required.

This course investigates the various operations of physical education and physical activity-based programing. Areas of study include leadership, budgeting, equipment and facility management, scheduling, legal liability and risk management, advocacy, public relations, career placement, and current trends in the profession.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Every semester

1

Other Requirements:

Prior to graduation, students must show competency in swimming, CPR, and first aid. First aid and CPR competency may be shown through participating in Red Cross programs and earning a CPR card or Advanced First Aid card. Swimming competency may be demonstrated through an Intermediate-level swimming instructor card, proper life-guarding credentials, and/or passing a Castleton University-administered swim exam. Students may also elect to take the following courses to meet those requirements:

Code Course Credits

PED 2010

Beginning Swimming

This course will focus on developing a variety of competencies required for proficient swimming, including body position, stroke technique, floating, treading water, and breathing. In addition, students will learn how to teach basic swimming skills with specific attention to instructional methods and safety considerations. Required physical education majors' swim exam will be administered in this course.

Fall (First Half of Semester), Spring (Second Half of Semester)

1

PED 2160

Emergency Care and Personal Safety

Emergency Care is an American Red Cross Emergency Response Course based on the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 1995 First Responder: National Standards Curriculum. This course will provide the participant essential information for developing the functional first aid capabilities of a first responder. As a crucial link in the EMS system, first responders evaluate and treat patients until more advanced medical help can arrive. This course does not provide state licensure for ambulance personnel.

Fee Fee $15.

Every semester

3

Teaching Option

Students wishing to work towards teacher licensure in K-12 Physical Education must apply and be accepted into Physical Education Gateway II, must apply and be accepted into the student teaching practicum, and, complete the PETE program requirements.

Code Course Credits

PED 3070

Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education

Principles and methods of physical education for grades K-6 are presented. Skill themes, movement concepts, and developmentally appropriate standards-based lesson and unit planning are emphasized. Laboratory experiences will involve microteaching in area schools.

Prerequisite: PED 2410 with a minimum grade of "B", minimum pass score on Praxis Core Academic Skills Test for Educators (or equivalent), and permission of instructor.

Fall

4

PED 3140

Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education

Principles and methods of teaching physical education for grades 7-12 are presented. Characteristics of learners, effective teaching techniques, unit and lesson planning, and implementation of lessons are emphasized. Laboratory experiences will involve microteaching in area schools.

Prerequisite: PED 2410 with a minimum grade of "B" , minimum pass score for Praxis Core Academic Skills Test for Educators (or equivalent), and permission of the instructor.

Spring

4

PED 4871

Directed Student Teaching In Physical Education I

This course is an opportunity for the student to teach under the guidance of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Students seeking teacher licensure in K-12 Physical Education must apply, qualify, and be admitted to student teaching. Course is taken concurrently with PED 4872 and PED 4720. completion of required major courses and GPA, departmental recommendation, professional and intellectual competencies as stated within application requirements.

6

PED 4872

Directed Student Teaching in Physical Education II

6

PED 4720

Seminar in Teaching Physical Education

The seminar prepares the student for the student teaching experience, supports the student during the experience, and introduces or reviews competencies associated with the role of the professional educator. Preparation of the teacher licensure portfolio is emphasized. Course is offered pass/no pass only.

Every semester.

1

K-12 Teacher Licensure:

To be recommended for licensure by the State of Vermont, a student must:

  1. Successfully complete and graduate from an approved program.
  2. Receive a grade of "B" or better in Student Teaching I and Student Teaching II and a "pass" in PED 4720.
  3. Maintain a GPA of 3.0 and a B average (GPA of 3.0) in the field of major studies.
  4. Meet the required standard for the licensure portfolio.
  5. Exemplify in conduct and attitude the maturity, judgment, ethical standards, and dedication expected in the teaching profession.
  6. Beginning in October of 2004, pass Praxis II examination in physical education content knowledge, multiple choice or constructed responses essay. (Test code: 0092) (Test code: 0091)