Wildlife and Forest Conservation Program Requirements

The B.S. degree in Wildlife and Forest Conservation has a foundation in biology and the ecological sciences with an emphasis on conservation and management of wildlife, biodiversity, and forests.

This program prepares students for careers in wildlife and fisheries science, as well as in park and habitat management, among other conservation career paths. Students could pursue these careers in federal, state, and local governments, or in the private sector via conservation organizations, NGOs, and consulting firms. Graduates will be able to provide technical assistance to private landowners, conservation districts, and other organizations in ways to best manage their living resources for long-term sustainability.

While this program serves the local and Vermont areas, it is also appropriate for students interested in a global perspective of conservation biology.

Complete these required courses (50-51 cr):

Code Course Credits

BIO 1121

Biology I

A comprehensive introduction to biology focused on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. The course provides an introduction to all areas of biology.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: One year of high school biology and chemistry.

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

BIO 1122

Biology II

A continuation of BIO 1121 Biology I, with particular emphasis on organisms, ecosystems, and evolution.

Lecture and lab.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

BIO 2530

Conservation Biology & Biogeography

This course covers the fundamentals of conserving biological diversity from the DNA level up to population, ecosystem, and the global scale. An overview of biodiversity along with the factors that contribute to the loss of species will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122

Spring

3

BIO 3060

Ecology

A study of the interrelationships between plants, animals, microorganisms and their abiotic environment. Problems in experimental design and ecological analysis will be explored. Some Saturday field trips are planned. Field trips to primitive areas are required.

Lecture and lab.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121, BIO 1122, and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051 with grades of "C" or higher.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 3065

Plant Ecology

This course covers the major concepts in plant community, population, physiological and evolutionary ecology through lecture, discussion and active field and laboratory activities. One or more field trips are planned.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121, BIO 1122, and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051 with grades of C or higher.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall, even years

4

BIO 3070

Genetics

A survey of the major fields of genetics with a focus on modern molecular genetics and genetic technologies. A weekly discussion and exploration period examines problem-solving strategies and hand-on applications of modern genetic technologies.

Prerequisite: BIO 2010 (may be taken concurrently) or BIO 2125, and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051.

Spring

4

CHE 1110

Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

-OR- CHE 1051 - Chemistry I (4 cr)

This course has its foundation in the basic chemical principles that are important to understand how our globe functions as an environmental system and how humans can alter the balance of natural forces. We will explore the scientific understanding of major issues such as climate warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, among others and the various feedback mechanisms that lead to either more positive or negative consequences.

Fall

3

MAT 2036

Biostatistics

This course introduces statistical concepts and analytical methods as applied to data encountered in ecological, environmental, and biomedical sciences. It emphasizes the basic concepts of experimental design, quantitative analysis of data, and statistical inferences. Topics include probability theory and distributions; population parameters and their sample estimates; descriptive statistics for central tendency and dispersion; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for means, variances, and proportions; the chi-square statistic; categorical data analysis; linear correlation and regression model; analysis of variance; and nonparametric methods. The course provides students a foundation to evaluate information critically to support research objectives and product claims and a better understanding of statistical design of experimental trials for biological products/devices.

Restrictions Students will be required to have a scientific calculator.

Prerequisite: Minimum math placement of MAT 2021 .

Every semester

4

WFC 1010

Natural Resource Management

This is a broad, introductory course that introduces foundational concepts in wildlife and forest sustainability, with an eye to the broader environment. Students will explore possible career paths and learn about the different groups and organizations that work to manage our natural resources. Students will work to identify problems and use data to propose solutions that benefit the land and the goals of the land manager.

Spring

3

WFC 2010

Conservation Field Experience

Fee TBD $300-$500

Fall

4

WFC 3010

Wildlife Management

The main focus of this course is on the principles used to manage wildlife resources and how different management agencies act in a way to sustain populations and restore species when necessary. To a lesser extent this course will explore fisheries as a managed resource as well.

Prerequisite: WFC 1010

Spring

3

WFC 3810

Conservation Internship

Students have the opportunity to work with one of the numerous governmental agencies or private sector companies in the field of conservation. Signed contract is required at the time of registration.

Restrictions Wildlife & Forest Conservation majors only.

Pass/No Pass only, Repeatable for credit

Every term

3

SCI 2010

Environmental Law & Policy

This course introduces students to the major federal and state laws, and court cases, related to environmental issues. Emphasis will not only be on what the current statutes are, but how lawsuits influence policy and law, and what are the mechanisms for enforcement of environmental law.

Spring

3

SCI 2210

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of modern geographic information systems (GIS). The class will consist of lectures, discussions, readings, demonstrations, and hands-on training exercises using ESRI's GIS software. This will give students experience in defining spatial problems and solutions, organizing and locating geographic data, manipulating data for display, and map creation and use of a desktop GIS. Students will be expected to use what they have learned to develop a final GIS project. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement at the Bachelor's level.

Fee Lab fee $40.

Spring, even years

3 or 4

And complete a minimum of 6 credits of relevant electives from this list (6 cr):

Code Course Credits

BIO 2540

Dendrology & Silviculture

This course will cover the identification, classification, distribution and nomenclature of trees, as well as methodology in assessing and implementing silviculture practices to control the growth, quality, and structure of forests to achieve ecological and economic objectives.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122

Fall, even years

3

BIO 3030

Ecology of Water

In this course we will investigate the ecology of the earth's most perfect liquid - water. The impact of large dams, ground water pumping, hydro-fracking, irrigation, and water diversions on the environment, biodiversity, and humanity will be investigated.

Restrictions A minimum of junior standing.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122 or permission of instructor.

Spring, odd years

3

BIO 3160

Animal Behavior

This course examines the behavior of animals as they interact with each other and the environment. Topics include anti-predator behavior, foraging behavior, territoriality, social interactions, communication, and migration. The goal of the course is to learn to think critically about animal behavior by understanding behavior on both the proximate (genetics, development and response to external stimuli) and ultimate (evolutionary) levels. In the laboratory, groups of students will design, carry out, and report on an independent research project.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122 with grades of "C" or better.

Fee Fee $50

Spring

4

BIO 3710

Special Topics in Biology

Course topics will vary; course is repeatable for credit as topics change.

Periodically

1-4

BIO 4260

Field Techniques and Current Topics in Wildlife Biology

This course is targeted for undergraduate students majoring in wildlife biology, zoology, forestry, or other natural resource programs in the Northeastern U.S., especially those from programs lacking intense field-based courses, but graduate students are also welcome. The course is intended to provide students with practical, hands-on training in the tools and techniques of field biology and allow them to apply those skills in a variety of exercises. Students will summarize data from small group projects and present results to the large group and instructors. Practicing biologists from across the region will be engaged as guest instructors for certain workshops and will be invited to lead discussion sessions on current wildlife management issues and lead field trips to demonstrate wildlife and habitat management practices on the ground.

Prerequisite: BIO 1141 and BIO 3060, or permission of instructor.

Fee Approximately $850

Summer

3

GEY 1030

Dynamic Earth

This is an introductory geology course which examines the geological features of the earth and the processes that operate in the interior and on the surface of the earth which are responsible for their formation. Topics studied include volcanos, earthquakes, mountain building, plate tectonics, glaciers, minerals, rocks, streams and groundwater. Also covered are the techniques and methods geologists use to learn more about the earth.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

GEY 3110

Hydrogeology

This is an applied hydrogeology course with lecture, laboratory and field experience. Course material will include the hydrologic cycle, ground water, wells, water quality/contamination and flow modeling. Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: GEY 1030, GEY 1050 or consent of the instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall, odd years

4

PHY 2110

Physics I

An introduction to the concepts and theories of physics for science majors. Topics include forces, motion, and energy. A weekly laboratory section explores concepts and the role of experimentation in science. This course will use elementary calculus in order to solve physics problems. University level calculus is required. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 1051.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 2532

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

(Total credits required for the major: 56-57)

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Click here for General Education Requirements.