Women’s and Gender Studies Minor Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

Complete the following course:

Code Course Credits

WGS 1020

Introduction to Women's And Gender Studies

This course enables students to understand and appreciate the rich and varied field of Women's and Gender Studies; to identify and explain ideas about gender and the ways that it has affected individuals; to understand how gender identity is shaped by race, class and culture, and what it means and has meant to be a gendered subject in the United States and abroad.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding or World View Frame of Reference.

3

and complete at least 15 credits from following list of courses:

Code Course Credits

COM 2140

Race, Gender and Sexuality in Media

Media are among our primary sources of images of people, places and things we do not encounter ourselves in our everyday lives. This course examines the images of women and racial and sexual minorities who have been on the fringes of policy development and yet at the center of narratives created by mainstream media. It takes a detailed look at the symbolic and social power of commercial media's role in constructing social and cultural differences around age, gender, race, class and sexuality.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: COM 1220 or consent of instructor.

Fee Fee $20

Spring

3

CRJ 3040

Women and Criminal Justice

An examination of contemporary issues and research on women as offenders, victims of crime, and criminal justice practitioners.

Prerequisite: CRJ 1010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

ECO 3050

Women in the Economy

Why do we observe differences between women and men in terms of work, income, consumption and ownership of property? Why have these differences varied over time, between countries, and across ethnic groups and social classes? This class draws upon both traditional and critical economic theories and analyses as well as empirical evidence to address these questions and also to evaluate the policy issues surrounding gender-based economic differences. Many of these questions are controversial; no single theory or perspective will be offered as the correct one. Instead, the process developed will be one of critical thinking. The class is expected to be of interest to men as well as to women.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: any Economics course is recommended, but not required.

Spring, even years

3

ENG 3610

Women Writers

This course examines American and world literature written by women, including such genres as the novel, biography, autobiography, poetry, and the essay. The course also investigates images of women as well as the intersection of genre, gender, race, socioeconomic class, and historical period.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Highly recommended: ENG 1310.

Fall, odd years

3

HIS 2210

History of Women in the U.S.

This course is a study of women's history. Using the United States as an example, this class will explore the roles that women have played historically and seek to question traditional narratives of history, in which women are often marginalized. What might colonialism, the Revolutionary War, slavery, the Industrial Revolution, the Civil War, the Great Depression or the Civil Rights Movement look like through women's eyes?

This course satisfies the World Views frame of reference.

Spring, odd years

3

HIS 3345

Masculinities in Modern Europe

This course examines the many meanings and practices of masculinity in Europe since the French Revolution. Starting with the assumption that ideas about masculinity are culturally constructed, we explore the relationship of masculinities to nationalism, imperialism, work, sexuality, war, politics, and other important elements of modern European history. The role of masculinities in justifying and perpetuating, and at times undermining, systems of power based on race, gender, and sexuality are central to our analysis.

Periodically

3

HIS 3450

Women in European History

A study of the changing role of women in European history is offered from the end of antiquity to the 20th century. Topics include women in public and private life, the economic and legal position of women, and the changing role of women in society.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

HIS 3475

Women and Gender in African History

This course examines the changing roles of both women and gender in African history, from precolonial through postcolonial societies. Using case studies from different eras and regions, the course explores political, social and economic change, and includes a discussion of sexualities and of African feminist critiques of western feminism.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

PED 3060

Women’s Health Issues

This course will explore and analyze current Women’s Health Issues. Topics to be considered are: research; and or lack of research related to issues in women’s health, medical ethics and women’s health; reproductive technology, human sexuality, family planning, euthanasia, consumer health, the right to life, battered women and battered women’s syndrome, politics and poverty in women’s health issues, the relation of health issues to social issues, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse and alcoholism, nutrition and weight control, emotional health, mental illness, women and ecology, adoption of preventive health behavior, and social change patterns in areas of concern to women’s health.

Spring

3

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 3240

Social Development

Examines systematic research and theory relating to issues in social and personality development, in particular: the development of conceptions of the self, achievement, aggression, altruism and moral development, sex differences and differential effects of familial and extra familial influences.

Spring, even years

3

PSY 4230

Psychology of Rape

This course examines the crime of rape from a psychological and legal perspective. Topics include: why rape occurs, becoming a survivor of rape, whether rapists can be rehabilitated, serial rapists, prison rape, male victims of rape, and legal reform.

Fall

3

SOC 1030

Social Problems

An examination of such problems as population, pollution, poverty, crime, and racism as they exist in contemporary American society.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

SOC 2040

Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender

An exploration of the historical and contemporary roots for discrimination (especially on the institutional level) on the basis of race, ethnicity, class, and gender. This course examines issues such as culture, identity, and oppression.

Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor.

Every semester

3

SOC 2170

Gender Studies

This course will provide an examination of the ways in which gender affects the personal and social experiences of women and men. Some of the topics to be addressed are historical perspectives, gender socialization, interpersonal relationships, sexuality and sexual orientation, power dynamics, and the roles performed by women and men in major social institutions.

Fall

3

SOC 3610

Seminar in Advocacy

Students taking this course are trained to be peer advocates for the CHANGE Initiative (Creating, Honoring, Advocating and Nurturing Gender Equity). Students will attend a weekend long training to learn how to advocate for survivors of sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, and harassment as well as attending weekly classes. Students are required to staff the PAC phone line and will do programming to change campus culture and decrease problems mentioned above.

Prerequisite: Application and permission of the instructor.

Fall

4

SPA 3160

Latin American Women Writers

This course focuses on the writings of the most prominent Latin American women writers of recent times. A variety of literary genres—poetry, essay, drama and novel will be studied. The topics of "machismo" and "marianismo" as well as the dynamics between the different socio-cultural realities and literature will be studied.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: SPA 3010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

SWK 2020

Family Violence

Analyzes the psychosocial dynamics of families disrupted by domestic violence. Aspects of child abuse, spouse abuse and elder abuse will be covered. Differential social work assessment and intervention will be emphasized.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every Semester

3

SWK 2030

Human Sexuality

An explanation of contemporary issues, theories and practices from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will analyze videos and a range of written content with respect to sexual messages and behavior. Aspects of sexual obstacles and conflicts with appropriate modes of intervention will also be highlighted.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

WGS 2080

Thinking Bodies

or SOC 2080 - Thinking Bodies 3 cr

An interdisciplinary study of the ways in which society thinks about bodies in relation to social locations. Students examine the various ways in which bodies are socially constructed, disciplined, and assigned meanings based on race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, age, and dis/ability. This course encourages students to consider experiences of embodiment from sociological and feminist perspectives.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

WGS 2710

Special Topics

Specialized topics in Women's and Gender Studies that reflect student interests and instructor expertise of specialties. Special topics will be announced the semester prior to the semester of the course offering.

3

WGS 2910

Independent Study

Provides the exceptionally curious and motivated student the opportunity to explore on an introductory level an aspect of the study of women and / or gender that is not offered by the courses listed in the course catalog. Students need to arrange with an appropriate faculty member a student-faculty independent study contract prior to registration.

Must be approved by women’s studies coordinator.

1-3

WGS 3210

Feminist Thought

This course examines the various waves of feminist movements, as well as the many feminist perspectives that exist. Students will be exposed to the contributions of feminist thinkers and understand the key debates within Women's and Gender Studies.

Restrictions Junior or Senior standing

Prerequisite: WGS 1020

3

WGS 3310

Feminist Methods: Research and Action

This course provides an introduction to feminist research methods. Students will be encouraged to apply their understanding of feminist theories to the methods presented in this course. Students will examine various feminist epistemologies, or ways of knowing. This course will engage the following central questions: Is there a feminist research method? What are feminist research methods? Should there be feminist research methods? How do feminist research methods overlap with or differ from other research methods?

Restrictions Junior or Senior standing

Prerequisite: WGS 1020 recommended

Spring

3

WGS 3710

Special Topics

Specialized topics in Women's and Gender Studies that reflect student interests and instructor expertise of specialties. Special topics will be announced the semester prior to the semester of the course offering.

3

WGS 3910

Independent Study

Provides the exceptionally curious and motivated student the opportunity to explore in greater depth an aspect of a women’s studies course that the student has already taken. Students need to arrange with an appropriate faculty member and a student-faculty independent study contract prior to registration.

Must be approved by women’s studies coordinator.

1-3

WGS 4510

Activism and Advocacy Project in WGS

This course is designed to support student involvement in the community through activism and advocacy. Students must design a sustainable project that serves the university and broader communities, and demonstrates students' involvement and agency.

Restrictions Junior or Senior standing or permission of the WGS program coordinator.

3

WGS 4610

Senior Project in Women's and Gender Studies

This is a capstone course that allows a student to either write a senior theoretical thesis in Women's and Gender Studies or work on a creative art form, such as film, installation art, music, etc. Students will prepare and present their culminating research or creative project, which incorporates feminist theory and praxis.

Prerequisite: At least 12 credit hours of WGS related courses or senior standing.

Every Semester

3

WGS 4810

Field Experience in Women's and Gender Studies

Students design and conduct an activist project in close supervision with a WGS faculty member to get hands-on experience to bring social change. Unlike internships, this course includes a major research component.

Restrictions A maximum of 6 credits of WGS 4810 may be applied towards the major or minor.

Every semester

3-6

WGS 4820

Internship in Women's and Gender Studies

Students who are Women's and Gender Studies majors and minors undertake career placements with local, state, or national organizations that address needs and conditions in today's society from the perspective of gender. A signed contract is required at the time of registration. Students must have at least 12 credits in Women's and Gender Studies or permission of instructor.

1-6

WGS 4910

Independent Study

Provides the exceptionally curious and motivated student the opportunity to explore in greater depth any aspect of women’s studies. The study must culminate in a major research paper or project. Students need to arrange with an appropriate faculty member and a student-faculty independent study contract prior to registration. Must be approved by women’s studies coordinator.

1-3

(Total credits required: 18 cr)

With prior approval of the Women's and Gender Studies Coordinator, other designated courses may be taken to fulfill the minor. These courses are offered on demand, with the topic announced at registration and the Women's and Gender Studies option indicated in the course description.