Directory

Scott Roper

Professor, Chair


Primary: (802) 468-1270
Fax: (802) 468-6045
Leavenworth Hall
Room 216
6 Alumni Drive

Biography

Scott Roper is a cultural and historical geographer. A native New Englander who joined the Castleton faculty in 2005, he has been teaching college-level geography since January, 1992. His interests are varied, but generally revolve around the regional geography of the United States, particularly New England, Florida, and the Great Plains. He has researched and written on subjects as diverse as American material culture (including stone walls, historic buildings, and cemeteries), the integration of baseball, the role of regional perception in landscape creation, and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in K-12 education. As coordinator of the Vermont Geographic Alliance since 2010, he has worked with National Geographic and local educators to promote the teaching of geography in Vermont schools. He is also active in municipal government, having served on his town’s Board of Selectmen, Historic District Commission, and Budget Committee.

A qualified historian and architectural historian under the Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR Sec. 61), Dr. Roper can often be found staring at historic buildings, roaming through cemeteries, or analyzing the state of the Boston Red Sox.

Education

Ph.D., University of Kansas
M.A., University of North Dakota
B.A., Clark University

Accomplishments

  • Coordinator of the Vermont Geographic Alliance, 2010-present
  • Appointed by Governor Peter Shumlin to serve on the Vermont Center for Geographic Information Board of Directors, 2013-14 and 2014-15
  • Member of the Board of Directors for the Pioneer America Society: Association for the Preservation of Artifacts and Landscapes, 2005-2014
  • Vermont representative to the Executive Board of the New England-St. Lawrence Valley Geographical Society/NESTVAL Division of the Association of American Geographers, 2007-2013
  • Edited the annual journal PAST: Pioneer America Society Transactions for the Pioneer America Society, 2005-2011
  • Book review editor for the journal Material Culture, 2003-2008
  • Helped organize annual meetings of the Pioneer America Society: Association for the Preservation of Artifacts and Landscapes in Utica, NY (2013), Stuart, FL (2011), and Castleton, VT (2010).
  • Elected to the Lyndeborough NH Board of Selectmen, 1999-2002, and to the Lyndeborough NH Budget Committee, 2010-2013 and 2014-present
  • Served on several municipal committees including the Zoning Board of Adjustment (alternate member), 2013-present; Historic District Commission, 2010-2013; Monuments Committee, 2010-2013; Meetinghouse Committee, 2006-2009; and Conservation Commission, 2006-2008.
  • Author of more than 20 articles, books, book chapters, reviews, and encyclopedia entries, including:
    • "'Wrought in the Spirit of our Ancestors': Ethnicity, Scale, and the Reinvention of a New England Town," in Blake Harrison and Richard Judd, eds., A Landscape History of New England (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2011), 303-322;
    • "Another Chink in Jim Crow? Race and Baseball on the Northern Plains, 1900-1935,” in Bill Kirwin, ed., Out of the Shadows: African American Baseball from the Cuban Giants to Jackie Robinson: The Best of Nine (Lincoln: Bison Books/University of Nebraska Press, 2005) 81-93;
    • (with Stephanie Abbot Roper) Citizen Soldiers: New Hampshire’s Lafayette Artillery Company, 1804-2004 (Portsmouth, NH: Peter E. Randall, Publisher, 2004;
    • "The World is Moving to a Higher Level: The Cost of Progress in Downtown Peterborough, 1913-1921," Historical New Hampshire 56:1-2 (2001) 34-53;
    • The Peterborough Savings Bank, 1847-1997 (Peterborough, NH: Sims Press/Directors of Primary Bank, 1999).
    • (with Stephanie Abbot Roper) "We’re Going to Give All We Have for this Grand Little Town: Baseball Integration and the 1946 Nashua Dodgers," Historical New Hampshire 53:1-2 (1998) 2-19;
    • "Maintaining the ‘Cheery Fires’: Servants’ Space in a Turn-of-the-Century Kansas House." Material Culture 28:3 (1996) 17-40.