Program Requirements

The three closely related fields of Archaeology, Geography, and Applied Anthropology apply a collaborative, place-based approach to study the under-researched South Lake Champlain Basin. Ongoing research collaboration among program faculty create integrative and experiential learning opportunities for students. The program utilizes methods-focused coursework to equip students with the advanced technical and conceptual skills required by a wide range of careers. Required internships facilitate the acquisition of additional training, relevant experience, and tangible work products that will contribute directly to student career development.

Program Mission and Goals:

The Archaeology, Geography, & Applied Anthropology program will:

  1. Provide a high-quality interdisciplinary education that helps students to achieve their personal, career, and creative goals.
  2. Train students in emergent technologies that will enhance their capabilities and opportunities in a competitive job market.
  3. Advance research into human history in the South Lake Champlain Basin.
  4. Continually improve program facilities and university capacities through targeted grants and ongoing fundraising.
  5. Strengthen ties with community partners through internships, outreach, and ongoing programming.
Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the Archaeology, Geography, & Applied Anthropology major, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the basic theoretical and methodological concepts of Archaeology, Geography, and Applied Anthropology.
  2. Appreciate the dynamic interplay between geography, cultural behavior, and long-term history at the core of current social and public policy issues.
  3. Utilize the interdisciplinary concepts and methodological frameworks of Archaeology, Geography, and Applied Anthropology in real world applications.
  4. Communicate effectively in oral, written, and graphic form using concepts and terminology appropriate to a wide range of career fields.
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in specific career-oriented technical skills and applications.
Career Outcomes:

Upon completion of the Archaeology, Geography, & Applied Anthropology major, students will possess:

  1. Training in advanced technical skills directly transferable to their anticipated career.
  2. Experience in collaborative research and presentation.
  3. Extensive hands-on experience from at least one career-related internship.
  4. A track record of project management through the concept, planning, execution, and reporting stages.
  5. A tangible work product that demonstrates the student's initiative and strong analytical and communication skills.

Major Requirements

All majors will complete a minimum of 33 credits: 9 credits in required core courses, 15 credits in electives, 6 credits of internship, and a 3-credit capstone seminar. All majors are strongly encouraged to complete one or more of the certificates offered by the program (see below).

Complete the 3 core courses (9 cr):

Complete each of these courses, preferably within the first year of study.

Code Course Credits

ANT 1010

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

An analysis of the origin and bases of culture. Its major components: cultural variation, cultural evolution, and cultural adaptation. Analysis of selected cultures as case studies.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

ANT 2010

Archaeology: Tracing the Human Past

This course examines how a society can be understood by looking at its material remains. Topics include: historical development of archaeology; its purposes, methods, theories and interpretation; archaeological sites as an endangered cultural resource; and a sampling of cultural evidence from around the world.

This course fulfills the Social & Behavioral Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

GEO 2150

Cultural Geography

This class focuses on the relationships between people and their physical and cultural environments, and on the analysis of the spatial expression of culture throughout the world. Students will be study the major subfields of cultural geography, understand those subfields in the contexts of folk, popular, material, and nonmaterial culture, and apply those subfields to local, regional, and world geography using appropriate approaches, methods, and tools.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

And complete 5 electives (15 cr):

Complete five of the following courses. To emphasize an interdisciplinary perspective, students must complete at least two courses each from Anthropology/Archaeology (ANT) and Geography (GEO). At least two courses must also be at the 3000 level.

Code Course Credits

ANT 2040

Field School in Archaeology

This course introduces the field methods used in archaeological investigations through direct participation in an ongoing field project. Students will broaden their understanding of human history and science through training in a wide range of techniques, including sampling design, survey, excavation, documentation, and illustration. Students will also gain practical experience using multiple technologies, including GPS, total station survey instruments, and drone photography. Daily discussions and guest lectures will enhance students' knowledge of local history.

Summer

3

ANT 2210

Anthropology and the Environment

This course explores the interface between culture and the natural environment from a cultural ecological perspective. Through cross-cultural comparisons, with an emphasis on the contrasts between small-scale and large-scale societies, it examines human relationships with nature. Particular attention is given to the effects subsistence practices, economics, politics, and globalization have on a culture's changing attitudes about and behaviors toward the environment.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

ANT 2710

Selected Topics in Anthropology

Specialized study in Anthropology with specific topics to be announced prior to each semester. Course offerings will be determined by student demand and faculty availability. Specific topics may include: ethnomusicology, indigenous Americans, culture area studies, archaeology, ethnography, and anthropology theory.

Prerequisite: ANT 1010.

Periodically

3

ANT 3010

Native Societies of America

This course examines relations between ecology and social organization in traditional native societies of North America. The first half of the course surveys Native American societies as a whole and the habitat in which they occurred. The last half is a detailed analysis of Central Arctic seal hunters, Northwest coast fishers, Plains bison hunters, Southwestern Pueblo builders, Mississippi Valley Moundbuilders, and Northeast farmers.

Periodically

3

ANT 3150

Applied Anthropology

Applied anthropology is the application of anthropological knowledge, methodology, and theoretical approaches to address contemporary human problems. This course introduces the basic issues of applied anthropology such as the history, ethics, and methods, and reviews cases in the major domains of the field. Applied anthropology is innately participatory and promotes community-centered praxis, an approach rooted in action, advocacy, and collaborative research. Therefore, students are required to complete at least 20 hours of community-based service as a key component of this course. The course provides students with the training for work in fields such as education, health and medicine, business and industry, environment and sustainability, and economic development.

Periodically

3

ANT 3160

3D Scanning & Digital Curation

The development of 3D scanning technology has revolutionized both the analysis of formal attributes and the ways in which information can be curated for the future and shared with the public. This course will introduce students to 3D scanning technology and its applications in Archaeology and beyond. Students will conduct a range of collaborative morphometric studies and produce a final project that will add to an ongoing digital curation project. This course provides students with training applicable to careers in museums, education, and digital curation.

Periodically

3

GEO 2050

Cartography

This course introduces the art and science of mapmaking, as well as benefits and limitations of various map types in different contexts. Using free, online, Geographic Information Systems software, students will learn methods for the appropriate creation, design, and interpretation of maps. Topics of discussion include map projections, color, artistic balance, generalization, symbolization, map types, and the roles of perception and bias in the creation and consumption of maps.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

GEO 2110

Time and Space in North America

Although we tend to think of North America as a more-or-less unified region, a closer look reveals long-standing regional cultural differences. In this course, we consider the international migratory patterns, adaptive strategies, and cultural mixing that influenced the development of American regionalism. In particular, we will focus on material culture, including regional architecture and cemetery patterns, in an effort to foster an appreciation for how remnant cultural landscapes can be "read" for their historical geographies.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall, even years

3

GEO 2210

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of modern geographic information systems (GIS). The class will consist of lectures, discussions, readings, demonstrations, and hands-on training exercises using ESRI's ArcView software. This will give students experience in defining spatial problems and solutions, organizing and locating geographic data, manipulating data for display, and map creation and use of a desktop GIS. Students will be expected to use what they have learned to develop a final ArcView project. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement at the Bachelor's level.

Fee Lab fee $60.

Spring, even years

3 or 4

GEO 3050

Conservation, Planning, and the Environment

This course considers the interactions of people and environments in political and geographical contexts. Through reading, writing, discussion, research, and experiential learning, students will study the impacts of human development on nature and the role of state and local government agencies in balancing economic growth with the need to protect local environments.

Spring, even years

3

GEO 3110

Reconstructing Past Landscapes

Using local landscapes as a point of departure, students will learn how to read human-created environments to help reconstruct, interpret, and preserve the past. They will also learn to identify, locate, utilize, and analyze a variety of primary and secondary resources and to employ appropriate technologies to support this work.

This course fulfills the World Views frame of reference.

Fall, odd years

3

GEO 3120

Applied Geographic Information Systems

In this course, students will locate, create, and analyze spatial data utilizing free open-source software, with particular attention paid to Quantum GIS. Students will apply their skills in the development and execution of a research project that, where possible, relates to their chosen major. No prior knowledge of Geographic Information Systems is required.

This course fulfills the Computing Internsive requirement.

Spring, odd years

3

And complete 1 or more internships (6 cr):

Complete a minimum of 6 credit hours of internships. Internships are developed in consultation with the student's program advisor and oriented toward the acquisition of specific technical skills and experiences required by his/her anticipated career. Potential internships include positions with public and private agencies around the state and in-house internships in partnership with program faculty.

Code Course Credits

AGA 3810

Internship in Archaeology, Geography & Applied Anthropology

and/or

AGAA majors complete a minimum of 6 credit hours of internship. Internships will be developed in consultation with the student's program advisor. Internships will be oriented toward the acquisition of advanced technical skills and experiences required by students' anticipated careers. Potential internships include positions with public and private agencies around the state and in-house internships in partnership with AGAA program faculty.

Permission from AGAA Program coordinator.

Periodically

3-12

AGA 4810

Internship in Archaeology, Geography & Applied Anthropology

AGAA majors complete a minimum of 6 credit hours of internship. Internships will be developed in consultation with the student's program advisor. Internships will be oriented toward the acquisition of advanced technical skills and experiences required by students' anticipated careers. Potential internships include positions with public and private agencies around the state and in-house internships in partnership with AGAA program faculty.

Permission from AGAA Program coordinator.

Periodically

3-12

And complete the capstone seminar (3 cr):

Complete a collaborative capstone seminar analyzing and evaluating your internship and program experiences. Students present the results of their work in an annual symposium and report published by the program.

Code Course Credits

AGA 4010

Capstone Seminar in Archaeology, Geography, & Applied Anthropology

Students in their final year of study in the AGAA Program will collaborate with program faculty and their internship supervisors to produce a culminating project highlighting their technical skills and experience in their career track. Student projects will be presented at an annual symposium and published in a digital report produced by the program.

Periodically

3

(Total credits required for the major: 33)

Certificates

Students majoring in Archaeology, Geography, and Applied Anthropology are advised to complete one or more of the Certificates sponsored by the program:

  • See the Archaeological Methods Certificate
  • See the Applied Geographic Information Systems Certificate
  • See the Applied Anthropology Certificate
  • See the Cultural Landscape Studies Certificate

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Click here for General Education Requirements.