Criminal Justice: Associates Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outline the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

Students graduating with an Associate Degree in Criminal Justice will:

  1. Know the difference between the criminal justice system and process, be able to identify historical trends in the evolution of each of the three components of the system, and identify and define the stages of the criminal justice processes. Additionally, they will be able to identify and compare the roles and responsibilities of criminal justice professionals throughout the system at each stage of the process.
  2. Know the sources of law in American society, distinguish between criminal and civil law, and identify U.S. Constitutional amendments most closely associated with criminal justice, as well as important U.S. Supreme Court decisions pertaining to those amendments.

Complete these Criminal Justice courses (29 cr):

Code Course Credits

CRJ 1010

Introduction to Criminal Justice

An overview of the American criminal justice system, tracing its history and development and assessing its strengths and weaknesses. Roles of the agencies that comprise the criminal justice system (representing law enforcement, courts, and corrections) are examined.

This course counts towards the Social & Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

CRJ 2010

Law Enforcement in America

An examination of the history and evolution of law enforcement in the United States. Among the topics examined in this course are: law enforcement careers; the police role; selection, recruitment, and training of personnel; occupational socialization & the police subculture; discretion; management and organizational behavior; and patrol/investigative functions. Other issues considered include police use of force; police-community relations, job stress, and corruption/ethical problems.

Prerequisite: CRJ 1010 passed with a grade of “C” or better.

Every semester

3

CRJ 2020

American Judicial Process

A course designed to provide students with an overview of the American judicial process; examining its history, structure, and operation. Topics considered include: court organization and administration; the courtroom “work group;” the trial and appellate processes; problems that plague the courts; and alternatives to courts for conflict resolution.

Prerequisite: CRJ 1010 passed with a grade of “C” or better.

Every semester

3

CRJ 2080

Correctional Philosophies and Practices

An interdisciplinary study of the historical and contemporary philosophies and practices of sentencing, punishment, and rehabilitation in American corrections. The course will be a comprehensive examination of all facets of institutional and community-based corrections, including facilities, probation, intermediate sanctions, and parole, as well as special and controversial issues in the field. Field study will be an essential component of this course and may include field trips, interviews and other research, guest speakers, and/or community service.

Prerequisite: CRJ 1010 passed with a grade of “C” or better.

Every semester

3

CRJ 2510

Criminal Law

An examination of the evolution and development of substantive criminal law. Topics examined include: common law vs. statutory crimes; elements of a crime; parties to a crime; criminal responsibility; and defenses to criminal culpability. Selected portions of the Vermont criminal code are also examined.

Prerequisite: CRJ 2020 or consent of instructor.

Every semester

3

CRJ 2810

Field Experience

*Courses with an asterisk must be completed with an average of “C” (2.00) or better.

Supervised observations of criminal justice agencies. The student will become familiar with the criminal justice system through a sequence of monitored, short-term field observations. Regular class meetings and written reports required.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above, and consent of instructor.

2

and complete one of the following courses (3 cr):

Code Course Credits

SOC 2040

Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender

An exploration of the historical and contemporary roots for discrimination (especially on the institutional level) on the basis of race, ethnicity, class, and gender. This course examines issues such as culture, identity, and oppression.

Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor.

Every semester

3

SWK 2040

Discrimination in American Society

An understanding of the dynamics and American history of prejudice and discrimination in relation to racial and ethnic minorities, women and the aged is developed. Special emphasis placed on issues relevant to Social Welfare.

Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

and complete these specific General Education courses (9 cr):

Code Course Credits

MAT 2021

Statistics I

This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010.

Every semester

3

PSY 1012

Introduction to Psychological Science

A survey of a wide variety of topics studied by psychological scientists. The course objective is to introduce students to the terms, concepts and methods of psychological science.

Restrictions This course is equivalent to Introduction to Psychology; students will not receive credit for both courses.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

SOC 1010

Introduction to Sociology

A systematic introduction to the study of social behavior and social organization. The major conceptual tools of sociology are used to explore the structure, processes, and content of social action; to provide insight into the regularity and diversity of human social behavior.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

(Credits required for the major: 41 cr)

Note:

In-service students should discuss these requirements with their Criminal Justice Advisor and/or the Coordinator of the Criminal Justice Program. Transfer students from criminal justice programs in other schools are urged to review their transcript evaluation with their Advisor and /or the Coordinator. They must satisfy the General Education and academic major requirements, regardless of the number of criminal justice credits transferred.