Exercise Science Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

For further information about this major, contact Dr. Justin Carlstrom, the Exercise Science Coordinator: Justin.Carlstrom@Castleton.edu

Exercise Science is the study of the physiological responses and adaptations to exercise. This program offers specializations in three areas: Strength and Conditioning, Clinical Specialist, and Research. Coursework is designed to aid students in the preparation for graduate school and nationally recognized certifications, including those offered by the American College of Sports Medicine and National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Students who complete a degree program in the Exercise Science will:

  1. Master knowledge and concepts fundamental to the pursuit of their disciplines, including those drawn from other fields of study;
  2. Locate, comprehend, assess, and apply the scholarly work of scientists;
  3. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing;
  4. Demonstrate the ability to follow laboratory protocols, safety standards, and data collection procedures;
  5. Connect their course content to an internship experience;
  6. Administer tests and interpret results in accordance with the requirements of the American College of Sports Medicine;
  7. Instruct patients, clients, and athletes as to the proper procedures for performing self-administered fitness tests and assessing their readiness for physical activity.

Complete the following courses (56 cr):

Code Course Credits

CHE 1041

General Chemistry I

complete all of these courses:

Fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include modern atomic theory and structure of atoms, chemical bonds, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry and molecular geometry. To succeed in this course, an understanding of applied algebra is necessary.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MAT 1020 or MAT 1221 or MAT 1320, or equivalent placement.

Fee Fee $50.

Fall

4

CHE 1042

General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHE 1041. Topics include solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction reactions and acid-base chemistry.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in CHE 1041 or CHE 1051

Fee $50 lab fee

Spring

4

AHS 2170

Strength Training Principles

Strength Training Principles is a course designed to develop the student’s knowledge in the techniques and theories of strength training. Focus will be on proper lifting technique and safety. Secondary attention will be devoted to designing strength-training programs. This is an activity class and participation is mandatory.

Every semester

2

BIO 2011

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

An investigation of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. Topics include: the cell, cellular metabolism, tissues, integument, skeletal system, articulations, and muscular and nervous systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Nursing, Physical Education, Natural Science, Psychology or Social Work major or consent of instructor. Previous experience in biology and chemistry (high school or college) is highly recommended.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

BIO 2012

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 2011. Topics include the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 or consent of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

PED 2160

Emergency Care and Personal Safety

Emergency Care is an American Red Cross Emergency Response Course based on the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 1995 First Responder: National Standards Curriculum. This course will provide the participant essential information for developing the functional first aid capabilities of a first responder. As a crucial link in the EMS system, first responders evaluate and treat patients until more advanced medical help can arrive. This course does not provide state licensure for ambulance personnel.

Fee Fee $15.

Every semester

3

AHS 3120

Kinesiology

This course is designed to present information concerning the study of human movement. The primary emphasis is on the investigation of the mechanics of movement in order to provide the student with an ability to analyze and correct physical skills and movement patterns. In addition, laboratory sessions are designed to enhance the understanding of the topics covered in lecture.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012

Every semester

3

AHS 3150

Physiology of Exercise

An examination of the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. Muscle, renal, endocrine and environmental physiology, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular function in response to exercise training will be emphasized and applied to laboratory activities.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011 and BIO 2012

Fee Fee $50

Every semester

4

AHS 3820

Practicum in Exercise Leadership

This service-learning course will allow students to apply acquired knowledge and skills in exercise testing and prescription to lead adults from the community in tailored exercise programs. Clients who have chronic illnesses such as heart disease, arthritis, or diabetes may be referred by local health practitioners. Students will work in the gym directly with clients performing physical fitness tests, implementing exercise plans, and monitoring progress. This course is for future exercise science, allied health professionals, and nurses who would like to gain practical experience working with a population older than university students.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 or permission of instructor

3

AHS 4152

Pathophysiology and Clinical Exercise Physiology

This course concentrates on the pathophysiology of selected diseases and the role of exercise. The diseases covered include cardiac, pulmonary, immune, metabolic, neuromuscular, and renal diseases. This information is important for those students who have an interest in clinical exercise physiology.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150/BIO 3151

Fall, odd years

3

AHS 4160

Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription

This course is designed as a practical study of current fitness testing protocols used in various fitness and clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on preparation, administration, and evaluation of various graded exercise testing protocols. In addition, students will gain experience in the area of exercise prescription for various populations based on the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines.

Lecture and lab.

Restrictions Restrictions: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, and Health Science Majors Only.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 and AHS 4250 or permission of instructor.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

AHS 4220

Scientific Foundations of Strength and Conditioning I

This is the first part of a two course sequence. The content of the fall semester course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive review of muscle and cardiovascular physiology, biochemistry, and endocrinology related to the principles of strength training and conditioning. This course will also assist those students who desire to take the National Strength and Conditioning Association's Certified Strength and Conditioning (CSCS) exam.

Prerequisite: AHS 2170 and AHS 3150

Fall

3

AHS 4221

Scientific Foundations of Strength and Conditioning II

This is a continuation of AHS 4220. Emphasis will be placed on sport analysis, program design, and facility management. The final weeks of this course will be spent reviewing and preparing students to sit for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's Certified Strength and Conditioning (CSCS) exam.

Prerequisite: AHS 4220

Spring

3

AHS 4250

Clinical Electrocardiography

The objective of this course is for students to learn cardiac function and electrophysiology. Focus will be given to interpretation of electrocardiography (ECG) testing data for the purpose of identifying normal function and pathological conditions.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150

Fee Fee $50

Fall

3

AHS 4260

Nutrient Metabolism and Athletic Performance

The course focuses on the mechanisms of energy production and expenditure involved in cellular metabolism with a special emphasis on carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. Relationships between optimal nutrition and sports and exercise, thermoregulation and fluid balance, and ergogenic aids on physical performance will be covered.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150 and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051

Spring

3

PED 4910

Senior Thesis

The course is designed to introduce students to research writing and research development in sports medicine including exercise science and athletic training. The formulation of a research proposal will be the primary emphasis. In addition, students present their proposals orally and in poster format.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

Every semester

3

AHS 4830

Internship In Exercise Science

(3 cr required)

See section on internships. Signed contract is required at time of registration.

1-12

AHS 4912

Senior Research In Exercise Science

This course is designed to complete the research process initiated in PED 4910 - Senior Thesis. Senior Research in Exercise Science will provide undergraduate students an opportunity to learn to do research under the close guidance of a faculty member. Students will further expand their proposal by developing informed consent and medical history forms, obtain Human Subjects Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, collect data, perform statistical analysis, and write the discussion and conclusion of the research project. Students will be responsible for presenting their research orally and potentially prepare an abstract/paper for publication.

Prerequisite: PED 4910 and permission of instructor, Periodically.

3

And complete 9 credits of Electives from this list:

Code Course Credits

AHS 1070

Basic Athletic Training

An investigation into the prevention, subsequent treatment and management of common orthopedic injuries. The course includes basic anatomy, use of therapeutic modalities, and principles of athletic conditioning. A practical study of applying athletic tape and wraps is included.

Fee Lab fee $30.

Every Semester

3

AHS 3813

Pharmacology and General Medical Conditions

This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level athletic trainer must possess in pharmacologic applications relevant to the treatment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity. In addition, the student will learn to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity.

Prerequisite: AHS 2510 or permission of instructor.

Fall

2

AHS 4170

Enhancement of Athletic Performance

This course focuses on the use of substances, programming, and recovery techniques that are used to improve athletic performance and adaptation to exercise. Focus will be given to both legal and illegal drugs, legal substances that are prohibited by organizations such as NCAA and WADA, and those substances that are both legal and allowed by the various athletic governing bodies.

Prerequisite: AHS 3150

Periodically

3

BIO 2010

Cell and Molecular Biology

This course provides science majors with the fundamentals of cell and molecular biology. Students study the basics of molecular biology, the flow of genetic information through the cell, its structure, function, metabolism, and regulation. The lab portion of the course will focus on mastery of standard cell and molecular biology techniques while exploring course concepts. This course is intended for science majors and minors only and will not satisfy the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding frame of reference.

Lecture and Lab

Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 1121 and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051 with a "C" or better.

Fee Lab fee $50

Spring

4

BIO 2125

Fundamentals of Microbiology

A study of the cellular structure and function of microorganisms, principally bacteria. The physiology, genetics, and interactions of bacteria with higher forms of life and the environment will be covered. The required laboratory will provide students with an understanding and practical knowledge of aseptic techniques and other common microbiology methods.

Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and BIO 1122 , or BIO 2011 and BIO 2012.

Fee Lab fee $50

Every Semester

4

BIO 3070

Genetics

A survey of the major fields of genetics with a focus on modern molecular genetics and genetic technologies. A weekly discussion and exploration period examines problem-solving strategies and hand-on applications of modern genetic technologies.

Prerequisite: BIO 2010 (may be taken concurrently) or BIO 2125, and CHE 1041 or CHE 1051.

Spring

4

BIO 3240

Advanced Human Physiology

This course will examine selected aspects of human physiology in health and disease, including the activity of nerves and muscles, circulation, respiration, metabolism, and water and electrolyte balance. Intended for students who have completed the Human Anatomy and Physiology sequence and wish to explore these topics in more detail.

Prerequisite: BIO 2011, BIO 2012, and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHE 1041, or CHE 1051.

Fall, even years

3

CHE 2111

Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds. Emphasis is on organic functional groups and their chemical properties, nomenclature and molecular structure. The laboratory introduces students to basic organic laboratory techniques of synthesis, purification and characterization. Lecture (3 hrs.) and lab (4 hrs). Students are strongly recommended to take Organic Problem Solving I (CHE 2113) together with this course.

Prerequisite: CHE 1042 or CHE 1052 with a grade of C or better.

Fee Lab fee $50.

Fall

4

CHE 2112

Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHE 2111. Continued study of organic functional groups and their chemical properties and molecular structures. Emphasis is on reaction mechanisms, aromaticity and spectroscopic methods od analysis of organic molecules. Students are strongly recommended to take Organic Problem Solving II ( CHE 2114 ) together with this course.

Lecture (3 hrs) and lab (4 hrs).

Prerequisite: CHE 2111

Fee Lab fee $50.

Spring

4

CHE 3011

Biochemistry I

This course provides an introduction to the major classes of biological molecules and their structure, function and metabolism in living systems. Students examine the structure of proteins, their function and their binding to other molecules. Enzymes and their kinetics and mechanisms are covered in detail. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of chemistry and the living world of biology.

Lecture

Prerequisite: CHE 2111 with a grade of "C" or better. CHE 2112 is strongly recommended.

Fall

4

MAT 2021

Statistics I

This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010.

Every semester

3

PED 2140

Fitness Center Management

This course is designed to explore and analyze current management practices in public, private, and corporate fitness centers. Topics to be considered include assessment practices, facility design, planning marketing, organizational aspects, and evaluation. Additionally, a review of certifications through various professional organizations and job opportunities will be discussed.

Prerequisite: Current CPR certification or permission of the instructor

Spring

3

PED 2072

Advanced Strength and Conditioning

This activity course is offered for individuals who have already achieved a high level of physical fitness but wish to participate in strength and conditioning activities to push themselves to an even higher level of fitness. The class will feature a variety of activities including speed and agility drills, strength training, circuits and cardiovascular training. It is recommended that each individual enter the course at a good level of fitness.

Fall (First Half of Semester), Spring (Second Half of Semester)

1

PED 4020

Applied Nutrition and Weight Control

Principles of human nutrition, the metabolism of nutrients during rest and exercise modes; the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and vitamins during rest and exercise; the role of exercise in the energy balance system for weight control; a study of various fad diets for weight control; and the concepts of overweight and obesity will be studied. An individualized project will be included.

Prerequisite: BIO 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

PSY 1050

Human Growth and Development

A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.

Every semester

3

PSY 3130

Health Psychology

Examination of the biopsychosocial model of health and disease. Topics will include: overviews of behavioral interventions and biofeedback, stress and stress management, pain and pain management, cancer, asthma, weight control and obesity, eating disorders and adherence to medical regimens.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

PHY 1051

General Physics I

An introduction to the concepts and theories of physics. Topics include forces, motion and energy. A weekly laboratory section explores concepts and the role of experimentation in science. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2110 or equivalent.

Lecture and lab.

This course fulfills the Scientific & Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference

Fee Lab fee $50

Fall

4

PHY 1052

General Physics II

A continuation of PHY 1051. Topics include electricity, magnetism, Optics, and waves. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for PHY 2210.

Lecture and lab

Prerequisite: PHY 1051

Fee Lab fee $50

4

(Credits required for the major: 65 cr)

Additional Information

-Students in the Exercise Science Program must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50.

-Students in the Exercise Science Program must earn a minimum grade of "C" in BIO 2011 and BIO 2012. Students who earn a grade lower than a "C" in BIO 2011 and/or BIO 2012 will not be allowed to sequence into post-requisite course work until the prerequisite deficiency has been rectified.

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Click here for General Education Requirements.