Global Studies Program Requirements

These requirements are from an excerpt from the University Academic Catalog, which outlines the requirements for a student to earn the distinction of being a Castleton University graduate. The complete catalog is available online.

The Global Studies major provides an opportunity to acquire information, knowledge, and interpretive paradigms that enhance students' understanding of the changing world order and enable them to live more fulfilling and useful lives. This multidisciplinary major requires coursework that trains students to analyze the world in a variety of contexts-geographic, historical, economic, environmental, political, cultural, social, religious, philosophical, and aesthetic. Through their courses and study abroad, students develop the critical skills they will need to achieve their goals in our increasingly integrated local, national, and world communities. Upon completion of the Global Studies major, students will be able to demonstrate:

  1. The ability to identify and analyze patterns of human interdependence, including
  • the contested notion of globalization, and the multiple and cumulative impacts of the powerful forces driving this process;
  • the global variety of organizational structures, institutions, and processes;
  • the ways in which cultures and peoples structure and frame common and competing interests in-and understandings of-the world;
  • interrelationships among cultures, environments, places, and technologies;
  • global environmental problems and mitigation strategies.
  1. In-depth knowledge and analysis of concepts, theories and information gained through a concentrated exploration of one particular global theme.
  2. In-depth knowledge and analysis of one particular region and its relationship to the rest of the world.
  3. Understanding of multiple worldviews derived from academic study, proficiency in a modern foreign language, and cultural immersion abroad.

All majors must complete 51 credits: 18 credits in required core courses, 9 credits in one thematic concentration, 9 credits in one regional concentration, 12 credits in a foreign language, 0-2 credits in GLB 3810 - Cultural Immersion Experience, and 3 credits in GLB 4610 - Global Studies Capstone Seminar.

I. Core Courses (18 cr)

These courses should be completed by the end of your fourth semester in the program

Code Course Credits

ANT 1010

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

An analysis of the origin and bases of culture. Its major components: cultural variation, cultural evolution, and cultural adaptation. Analysis of selected cultures as case studies.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

ECO 1040

Global Economic Issues

In the past fifty years globalization has profoundly changed economic reality for hundreds of millions of people throughout the world, for some much for the better and for others decidedly not. This course examines that changing reality and analyzes its causes and consequences from a variety of perspectives. We address many of the difficult, complex, and contentious issues that arise as the people of the world try to create prosperous and thriving societies.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring, even years

3

GEO 2020

World Regional Geography

In this course, students will consider the locational and regional characteristics of the world's diverse cultures. We will apply a variety of geographical models and perspectives relating to specific regions of the world to better understand the conflicts, commonalities, and general human geographies among world regions and culture groups.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

GLB 1010

Introduction to Global Studies

This course employs multidisciplinary perspectives to introduce students to concepts, issues, theories and methodologies that assist the student to attain a better understanding of the meaning and significance of the historical and contemporary processes of globalization. Topics covered include: the global economy; global dimensions of environmentalism; international and global institutions; the changing role of the nation state; and the interaction between local, national, regional and global culture and social patterns.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

HIS 1135

Global History

This course introduces students to the discipline of history in general and to the field of global history in particular. It examines the roots and expansion of globalization - broadly defined as the growing interconnectedness of our world - from the rise of Islam to the 21st century.

Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

POS 1030

Comparative Politics and Government

An introduction to the study of politics by comparing different types of political regimes, with particular attention to the politics and daily lives of their peoples.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

II. Thematic Concentration (9 cr)

Select ONE concentration (A, B, or C) and complete three courses within that concentration. No course fulfilling the Thematic Concentration may be counted for the Regional Concentration or vice versa.

A. International Political Economy, Governance and Human Rights

This thematic concentration is designed for students interested in global institutions, power dynamics, and political processes, and who aspire to careers in the diplomatic service, the UN, peace work, or other international non-governmental organizations.

Code Course Credits

ECO 3220

International Trade and Development

This course offers an overview of theory, recent data, and controversies surrounding the interlinked topics of international trade and economic development in an increasingly integrated world economy. We will examine the philosophical commitments underpinning the debates, followed by a further examination of economic concepts, and a look at the facts of the global economy, with a primary focus on the developing world.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: At least one previous course in economics is highly recommended but not required.

Fall, even years

3

GLB 2030

Coffee and the World

This course uses a familiar commodity - coffee - as a lens through which to examine the relationship between the familiar goods we consume and what it takes to deliver them to us. Coffee is the second-most traded good in the world (after oil) and its production, trade, and consumption affect millions of people. Despite this, most people know very little about it. What they do know is focused almost entirely on consumption of the final product. Throughout the semester, we will draw back the curtain on coffee to learn how our local choices affect the world.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Offered periodically

3

POS 2040

International Relations

An examination of relations between the nations and peoples of the world, with attention to the various theoretical attempts to make sense of international relations; conflicting interpretations of the modern nation-state system; the post World War II world; East-West conflict, North-South conflict; the causes of war; and the search for global and economic order.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

POS 2210

Political Ideologies

This course will survey a wide variety of modern and contemporary ideologies, and analyze several in greater depth. These will include Marxism-Communism, Socialism, Liberalism, Capitalism, Libertarianism, Feminism, Nazism-Fascism, Environmentalism, Anarchism, Theocratic Utopianism and several types of Multi-culturalism.

Periodically

3

POS 3221

Political Philosophy I

What is justice? the good life? and how can one live a good life? These are among the many questions raised by this course which is taught in a seminar format that encourages student participation, leadership and discussion. Plato's Republic is the main text that is read as a way of contrasting classical and modern political philosophies and seeing with fresh eyes the present human condition and the many questions and problems it poses.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall, odd years

3

POS 3222

Political Philosophy II

The study of modern political thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Mill and Marx, in order to understand their influence on current perceptions of the human condition. Attention will also be given to the fundamental disagreement between modern and classical political philosophies as a way by which new perspectives on current political issues may be reached.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring, even years

3

POS 3250

International Organizations

This course will be an analysis of the purposes, structures, and processes of a wide variety of both governmental and non-governmental international organizations, with a particular emphasis on the reasons for the growing significance of such organizations in the contemporary international community. A major focus will be the United Nations and its evolving roles in the post-Cold War era. We will use the issue of the relationship between human rights and national interests as a perspective for organizing our analysis of the development of international organizations as possible alternatives to, or adjuncts of, the sovereign nation state.

Prerequisite: POS 1030 or POS 2040.

Periodically

3

POS 3260

Middle Eastern Politics and Government

The Middle East has been an important region of the world since the beginning of recorded history. Many of the oldest civilizations arose in this area and made significant contributions to the development of world culture. Today, the region continues to have great significance to the larger world community, culturally, economically, and strategically. This course will be a consideration of the political systems of a number of Middle Eastern and North African nations (from Iraq to Morocco), with special attention not only to the government structures and processes, but also the culture and socio-economic context in which these political systems exist. There will be an emphasis on the dynamic interaction between religious and secular authority, and between tradition and modernity, and how these issues have particularly influenced the development of many of these nations.

Fall semester, alternate years Fall, odd years

3

POS 4010

US Foreign Policy

This course will be an analysis of US foreign policy in terms of its historical, and theoretical roots; the institutional policy-making structure; domestic and international influences on policy-making; and enduring and emerging issues. There will be particular emphasis on the impact on US foreign policy of the end of the Cold War, and globalization. The class will consider questions, such as: Is there a “new world order” developing in the twenty-first century? What will be, or should be, the role of the US in this order? What are likely to be the major US foreign policy issues of the next several decades? How will the evolution of the role of international institutions affect US foreign policy goals and strategies?

Spring 2013, Spring 2016

3

B. Environment/Sustainability

This thematic concentration is designed for students interested in the social science of environmental issues, and who aspire to careers devoted to solving environmental threats on a global scale.

Code Course Credits

ANT 2210

Anthropology and the Environment

This course explores the interface between culture and the natural environment from a cultural ecological perspective. Through cross-cultural comparisons, with an emphasis on the contrasts between small-scale and large-scale societies, it examines human relationships with nature. Particular attention is given to the effects subsistence practices, economics, politics, and globalization have on a culture's changing attitudes about and behaviors toward the environment.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

ECO 3060

Political Economy of the Environment

How do we have both a healthy environment and a healthy economy? The goal of this class is to examine the intersections of economic and ecological systems in a social and political context, and to help students develop an understanding of the controversies around the analytical and policy frameworks now evolving which may or may not help to solve some pressing environmental problems. In particular, students will learn to use the tools of economic analysis, both neoclassical and alternative, to provide perspective to the issues. They can expect to gain insight into the complexity of the political and economic issues surrounding the environmental and environmental justice movements. Finally, students can expect to gain insight into the debates around growth and sustainability.

Prerequisite: any Economics course is highly recommended, but not required.

Spring, odd years

3

ENV 1210

Environmental Harm and Mitigation Strategies

This course examines the problems in the interactions between human society and our natural environment. It is an introductory exploration of the pressures and correctives which our society places on all our life-sustaining ecosystems, while at the same time being utterly dependent on them. We will examine the depth and scope of the problems, the development of protective policies, and the variety of views on how best to proceed, at local, state, national, and global levels. Simultaneously, we will gain some hands-on experience at the local level with our service-learning work with the local community. A full understanding of the scope of environmental harm we are now facing can be very discouraging, so the course will also focus on the myriad ways, large and small, that we can and already do work to overcome the harm.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fall, odd years

3

GEO 2150

Cultural Geography

This class focuses on the relationships between people and their physical and cultural environments, and on the analysis of the spatial expression of culture throughout the world. Students will be study the major subfields of cultural geography, understand those subfields in the contexts of folk, popular, material, and nonmaterial culture, and apply those subfields to local, regional, and world geography using appropriate approaches, methods, and tools.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

GEO 2220

Weather and Climate

This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of meteorology and climatology. Students will investigate earth-sun relationships, air-mass formation and movement, wind, fronts, severe storms, cloud formation and identification, cyclogenesis and pressure systems, precipitation, global circulation patterns, atmospheric pollution, and global climate change.

This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

GEO 3080

Globalization and the Environment

or ENV 3080 - Globalization and the Environment 3 cr

In this course, students consider relationships between the environment and globalization—including economic, political, cultural, and ideological globalization. Environmental problems and possible solutions to those problems are considered. Issues may include, but are not limited to: global climate change, fisheries collapse, “peak oil,” soil erosion and depletion, acid rain, deforestation, groundwater and surface water pollution, estuary health, and ozone depletion.

Spring, even years

3

PHI 3160

Environmental Ethics

This course is a survey of ethical issues involving humans and the natural environment. Central problems are: Of what moral value is, or what moral responsibilities do humans have toward, the natural world? Animals? Future generations? Are the ethical issues at odds with economic issues? Current ethical theories or movements to be studied include the Land Ethic, Deep Ecology, Biocentrism, and Ecofeminism.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Spring, even years

3

POS 2310

Environmental Politics

This course will analyze various aspects of environmental policy making in both the U.S. and internationally. It will begin with various philosophical and ideological perspectives concerning the relationship between man and nature. There will be consideration of how environmental issues interact with various other types of societal goals, particularly economic prosperity, security and freedom. The class will study aspects of the environmental policy process and its outcomes in the U.S. by the use of a number of case studies relevant to particular policy problems (including air and water pollution; biological engineering; and energy). It will also be a consideration of the international regimes to deal with these issues, and the relationship between environmental and economic development issues.

Fall, odd years

3

C. Global Dynamics of Culture

This thematic concentration is designed for students interested in the cultural dimensions of our world, and who aspire to careers that could take them abroad and that require well-developed cultural sensitivities. Students should keep their career goals in mind as they select from this broad array of culture-related courses. No more than 6 credits may be taken in any one of four world regions (Africa & Middle East, Asia, Europe, the Americas).

Code Course Credits

ANT 3210

Anthropology of Food

The relationship between food, culture, and society, and its role in historical and contemporary cultures is now recognized as a serious field of research and scholarship, especially in anthropology and related fields. Employing an interdisciplinary approach, including culinary history, archeology, economics, diet and nutritional studies, as well as cooking demonstrations, guest cooks, and dining, the course will examine the function and meaning of food and cuisine as a way to understand cultural invention and identity, social organization, conflict, and social change.

Fee Lab Fee $50.

Periodically

3

COM 2140

Race, Gender and Sexuality in Media

Media are among our primary sources of images of people, places and things we do not encounter ourselves in our everyday lives. This course examines the images of women and racial and sexual minorities who have been on the fringes of policy development and yet at the center of narratives created by mainstream media. It takes a detailed look at the symbolic and social power of commercial media's role in constructing social and cultural differences around age, gender, race, class and sexuality.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: COM 1220 or consent of instructor.

Fee Fee $20

Spring

3

COM 2160

International Communication

This course will provide a critical framework for understanding the social, political and ethical dimensions of the flow of information between nations. Central to the study will be an analysis of inter-governmental actors such as the UNESCO and the WTO in governing transborder data flows. Emphasis will be placed on examining language as an ideological tool, cultural imperialism, news imbalance, modernization and dependency, and globalization.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

COM 2330

International Cinema

-OR- THA 3135 - International Cinema 3 cr

An introductory survey of non-U.S. cinema, exploring prominent film movements and national cinemas from the 1940's through the present. Films screened in the course will range from popular genre cinema to art and experimental cinemas.

Class meets for one four-hour period weekly.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: COM 1150 or consent of instructor.

Fee Screening fee $15

Fall, odd years

3

ENG 2161

World Literature through Renaissance

This course investigates salient texts from a variety of different cultures, most of which are related to one another by origin or influence. The booklist changes each time the course is offered, and texts are chosen for the contributions they can make to students' knowledge of world literature and ability to contextualize the events, texts, and persons of today's world. Recent selections have included Plato's Symposium, the Bhagavad Gita, the Koran, Poems of Rumi, and Dante's Paradiso.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: ENG 1061. Highly recommended: ENG 1310.

Fall, even years

3

ENG 2162

World Literature from Enlightenment

In the novels, poetry, and essays read for this course, the major religious traditions confront modernity. Among the changes to which these texts respond are: the voyages of exploration and discovery, the religious warfare that shook Europe in the seventeenth century, the Enlightenment and its violent triumph in the French Revolution, and the modern experience of world war.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: ENG 1061. Highly recommended: ENG 1310.

Spring, odd years

3

ENG 3290

Studies in World Literature

Topics for this course may include literature from an historical period, a major author, or a theme or genre in world literature. The specific subject of the course will be announced at registration.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall, even years

3

HIS 1010

Roots: Historical Perspectives on Global Problems and Issues

This course explores the historical roots of current global problems and issues such as terrorism, religious fundamentalism, environmental degradation, species extinction, racism, genocide, global warming, new technology, famine, AIDS, unemployment, war, poverty, disease, and other human rights issues. Both recent and more distant historical factors will be studied in order to understand why these problems exist, how they may be changing, and what an informed citizen can do to help alleviate them. Students will 1) read and discuss a variety of news and other sources of information, interpretations, and commentaries; 2) examine the uses and abuses of historical analysis; and 3) demonstrate, in a culminating individual project, how historical perspective and analysis can suggest causes of, and humane remedies for, a particular global problem or issue. This course will, whenever possible, incorporate service-learning components in order to help students and faculty meet the goals of the course.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

HIS 2260

Asia in the World

Contemporary discussions of globalization often lack historical and regional perspective. This course provides just that: an examination of the economic, religious, diplomatic, military and cultural relationships among and between Asians and the rest of the world from ca. 600 to the present time. Focus on India, China, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines and Pakistan. We will address imperial domination and revolutionary resistance, economic and ethnic nationalism, current dynamics, and the role of historical memory, as in the legacy of World War II.

Spring

3

HIS 2335

Asia through Food and Film

This course uses food and film to teach about cultural experiences of Asians and their historical relationships to the lands and to the peoples they encountered through migration, trade and conquest. Its basic goal will be to stimulate students’ thinking and enthusiasm for learning more about Asia, but it also aims to challenge them to consider how culture, environment, economics, and politics intersect in the foods people eat, and how historical change and continuity reflect and reverberate in that intersection. A multisensory understanding of Asian culture and history is gained through readings, films, class lecture and discussion, and cooking and eating a variety of Asian foods. Fees: $25 for cooking ingredients, restaurant items, and honoraria for guest gourmets to give presentations and cooking demonstrations.

Fall

3

HIS 2410

History and Culture of Latin America

The pre-Columbian Indian cultures of the New World; the Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonial empires; the political and cultural divergence that followed independence; the economic and social problems of the Latin American republics and the course of their relations with the United States.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring, odd years

3

HIS 2431

African History Before 1885

An introduction to the richness of African history before its wholesale colonization by Europeans. This course explores societies across the continent, including ancient Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Kongo, Zimbabwe, the Zulu kingdom, and the trading city states of the Swahili coast, as well as smaller stateless societies. We explore the role of long-distance trade in shaping the political, economic, social and cultural history of African societies, including the trans-Saharan, Indian Ocean and transatlantic trade. The course begins with ancient Egypt and ends with the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, and the beginnings of European colonization.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

HIS 2432

African History After 1885

After 1885, European colonization changed the political map and history of Africa; postcolonial governments continue to struggle with this and other legacies of colonialism, while facing new challenges. Using documentary and feature film, novels, memoirs and scholarly texts, this course provides an introduction to the history of colonial and post-colonial Africa.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

HIS 3210

Social History of Latin America

This course is designed to explore various issues in the social history of Latin America. Topics will include race and ethnic relations, labor, gender, rural society, and class as presented in the journal literature, therefore reflecting much of the latest research on these topics.

Periodically

3

HIS 3220

Revolutions in Latin America

This course examines the role revolutionary violence played in establishing a modern Atlantic world based on the idea of the liberal nation-state. We will take as our guiding assumption that liberation movements in Latin America played a key role in that process, but we will at times consider the critical influence of revolutions in North America and Europe on events in Latin America. We will especially consider the roles of nationalism, Marxism, and anti-colonialism in providing models for revolutionary violence.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

HIS 3340

Europe and the Middle East

Since ancient times, Europe and the Middle East have had a shared history, a history marked by both conflict and cooperation. This course explores European perceptions of - as well as conflicts and encounters with - the Middle East since the rise of Islam in the seventh century. We examine the political, military, economic, social, and cultural interactions between the two regions as well as the roots of contemporary problems.

Periodically

3

HIS 3475

Women and Gender in African History

This course examines the changing roles of both women and gender in African history, from precolonial through postcolonial societies. Using case studies from different eras and regions, the course explores political, social and economic change, and includes a discussion of sexualities and of African feminist critiques of western feminism.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

HIS 3480

Special Topics: Africa in Global History

This seminar explores selected advanced topics, ranging from ancient to contemporary African history. The specific topic and course description will be announced prior to each registration period, but each course will examine both primary and secondary sources and will explore African history in the context of global connections and comparisons. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

HIS 3510

Chinese History and Culture

An introductory survey of Chinese history and culture from early China to today. Topics will include images of China in the West; art, language, literature, and beliefs; the evolution of traditional social roles and identities; the rise of the imperial state and problems of empire; Western imperialism; major movements for reform and revolution; the status of women; the cultural revolution; democracy and the roles of intellectuals and artists; and China's international interests today and over time.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

HIS 3520

Japanese History and Culture

An introductory survey of Japanese culture and history from ancient times to today, including the foundations and evolution of the Japanese state; the role of Shinto, Buddhism and other belief systems in society and politics; the significance of Chinese influence; rise of the samurai and the philosophy of bushido; the "floating world" of urban Japanese culture; imperial restoration and problems of empire; WWII and the U.S. occupation; and economic competitiveness and Japan's international interests.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

HIS 3570

History, Memory and War

This course focuses on three of America’s wars with Asia (World War II in the Pacific; the Korean War, and the Vietnam War), and provides an opportunity for each student to undertake a research project on a war of his or her choosing. The course takes a cultural and comparative approach to history and memory. We examine the public history controversies surrounding the representation and interpretation of wars, and we analyze the social, political, and personal interplay of history, collective memory, and national consciousness by comparing Asian, European, and American experiences.

Spring 2015, Spring 2018

3

HIS 3720

Topics in Asian History

This course introduces Asian history by focusing on topics that reflect current events and student interests. Topics will change from year to year, therefore, and may include, for example, the democracy movement in China; Asia through film and fiction; the cultural revolution and beyond; modern Chinese cultural critique; women in Asia, the body in Asia as a site of culture and history; and the struggle for democracy and economic growth in East Asia. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

Periodically

3

MUS 1080

Global Music

This course is a study of the world's musical cultures. The course is designed for music, music education, and non-music majors looking to develop an understanding of music in our global era.

This course fulfills an Aesthetic Understanding or Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.

Fee Fee $20.

Every Semester

3

PHI 2010

Comparative Religions

This course is a study of several major religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and perhaps some African and Native American religious traditions. The philosophies of Taoism and Confucianism will also be considered. Special attention is given to religious ideas about the divine or spirituality, the nature of reality, human nature, and the proper life for humans.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Previous course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

Fall

3

SOC 3160

Anthropology of Religion

This course offers a cross cultural and sociological examination of the function, meaning, and evolutionary significance of religious symbols and practices in human societies. An examination of the origin and evolution of spiritual or supernatural cultures- including animism, magic, witchcraft, myth, and theism- will provide a historical and cross cultural perspective on the varieties of religious experience.

Periodically

3

III. Regional Concentration (9 cr)

Select ONE region (A, B, C, or D) and complete three courses within that region. No course fulfilling the Thematic Concentration may be counted for the Regional Concentration or vice versa.

A. Africa and Middle East

Code Course Credits

HIS 2431

African History Before 1885

An introduction to the richness of African history before its wholesale colonization by Europeans. This course explores societies across the continent, including ancient Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Kongo, Zimbabwe, the Zulu kingdom, and the trading city states of the Swahili coast, as well as smaller stateless societies. We explore the role of long-distance trade in shaping the political, economic, social and cultural history of African societies, including the trans-Saharan, Indian Ocean and transatlantic trade. The course begins with ancient Egypt and ends with the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, and the beginnings of European colonization.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

HIS 2432

African History After 1885

After 1885, European colonization changed the political map and history of Africa; postcolonial governments continue to struggle with this and other legacies of colonialism, while facing new challenges. Using documentary and feature film, novels, memoirs and scholarly texts, this course provides an introduction to the history of colonial and post-colonial Africa.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

HIS 3340

Europe and the Middle East

Since ancient times, Europe and the Middle East have had a shared history, a history marked by both conflict and cooperation. This course explores European perceptions of - as well as conflicts and encounters with - the Middle East since the rise of Islam in the seventh century. We examine the political, military, economic, social, and cultural interactions between the two regions as well as the roots of contemporary problems.

Periodically

3

HIS 3475

Women and Gender in African History

This course examines the changing roles of both women and gender in African history, from precolonial through postcolonial societies. Using case studies from different eras and regions, the course explores political, social and economic change, and includes a discussion of sexualities and of African feminist critiques of western feminism.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

HIS 3480

Special Topics: Africa in Global History

This seminar explores selected advanced topics, ranging from ancient to contemporary African history. The specific topic and course description will be announced prior to each registration period, but each course will examine both primary and secondary sources and will explore African history in the context of global connections and comparisons. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

B. Asia

Code Course Credits

HIS 2260

Asia in the World

Contemporary discussions of globalization often lack historical and regional perspective. This course provides just that: an examination of the economic, religious, diplomatic, military and cultural relationships among and between Asians and the rest of the world from ca. 600 to the present time. Focus on India, China, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines and Pakistan. We will address imperial domination and revolutionary resistance, economic and ethnic nationalism, current dynamics, and the role of historical memory, as in the legacy of World War II.

Spring

3

HIS 2335

Asia through Food and Film

This course uses food and film to teach about cultural experiences of Asians and their historical relationships to the lands and to the peoples they encountered through migration, trade and conquest. Its basic goal will be to stimulate students’ thinking and enthusiasm for learning more about Asia, but it also aims to challenge them to consider how culture, environment, economics, and politics intersect in the foods people eat, and how historical change and continuity reflect and reverberate in that intersection. A multisensory understanding of Asian culture and history is gained through readings, films, class lecture and discussion, and cooking and eating a variety of Asian foods. Fees: $25 for cooking ingredients, restaurant items, and honoraria for guest gourmets to give presentations and cooking demonstrations.

Fall

3

HIS 3510

Chinese History and Culture

An introductory survey of Chinese history and culture from early China to today. Topics will include images of China in the West; art, language, literature, and beliefs; the evolution of traditional social roles and identities; the rise of the imperial state and problems of empire; Western imperialism; major movements for reform and revolution; the status of women; the cultural revolution; democracy and the roles of intellectuals and artists; and China's international interests today and over time.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Fall

3

HIS 3520

Japanese History and Culture

An introductory survey of Japanese culture and history from ancient times to today, including the foundations and evolution of the Japanese state; the role of Shinto, Buddhism and other belief systems in society and politics; the significance of Chinese influence; rise of the samurai and the philosophy of bushido; the "floating world" of urban Japanese culture; imperial restoration and problems of empire; WWII and the U.S. occupation; and economic competitiveness and Japan's international interests.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring

3

HIS 3570

History, Memory and War

This course focuses on three of America’s wars with Asia (World War II in the Pacific; the Korean War, and the Vietnam War), and provides an opportunity for each student to undertake a research project on a war of his or her choosing. The course takes a cultural and comparative approach to history and memory. We examine the public history controversies surrounding the representation and interpretation of wars, and we analyze the social, political, and personal interplay of history, collective memory, and national consciousness by comparing Asian, European, and American experiences.

Spring 2015, Spring 2018

3

HIS 3720

Topics in Asian History

This course introduces Asian history by focusing on topics that reflect current events and student interests. Topics will change from year to year, therefore, and may include, for example, the democracy movement in China; Asia through film and fiction; the cultural revolution and beyond; modern Chinese cultural critique; women in Asia, the body in Asia as a site of culture and history; and the struggle for democracy and economic growth in East Asia. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

Periodically

3

PHI 2110

Asian Philosophies

This course is a survey of the major philosophical traditions of Asia, to include Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, and Zen Buddhism. Included is an introduction to their mythology, art, music, and ritual as these exemplify philosophical ideas.

Periodically

3

C. Europe

Code Course Credits

ARH 2011

Survey of Western Art I

History of Western Art as expressed through architecture, sculpture and painting; Prehistoric to Renaissance art.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Every Semester

3

ARH 2012

Survey of Western Art II

History of Western Art as expressed through architecture, sculpture and painting; Renaissance to the present.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Prerequisite: ARH 2011 if possible.

Spring

3

ARH 3010

Classical Art: Greece and Rome

History of Ancient Greek and Roman architecture, sculpture and painting.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Periodically

3

ARH 3030

Italian Renaissance Art

History of architecture, sculpture, and painting in Italy from ca. 1200 to ca. 1600.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Periodically

3

ARH 3040

The Art of Medieval Europe

History of European art and architecture from the fall of Rome through the Romanesque and Gothic periods.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Periodically

3

ARH 3051

History of Nineteenth Century Art

Western painting and sculpture from the late eighteenth century and Neoclassical period to 1900.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Spring, odd years

3

ARH 3052

History of Twentieth Century Art

European and American painting and sculpture from 1900 to 1945.

This course counts towards the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frames of Reference.

Periodically

3

ENG 3170

Epic Poetry

This course studies a selection of important texts of the epic tradition, from its ancient beginnings (including Homer) to its rebirth as an English poetic form. Issues considered may include translation, influence, orality and literacy, and the claims of poetry on the epic scale.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Highly recommended: ENG 1310, ENG 2161, and ENG 2162.

Fall, odd years

3

HIS 2255

Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This course examines European history from the medieval period through the French Revolution. We survey the major events of this period, such as the Crusades, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the "Age of Exploration," and the Enlightenment, while also paying particular attention to the cultural, intellectual, and social developments that accompanied these events. While this course is primarily concerned with European history, we also consider this history in a global context throughout the semester.

Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

HIS 2285

Modern Europe

This course examines European history from the French Revolution to the collapse of the Soviet Union. The class surveys the critical events of the period, including the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, the two world wars, and the Cold War. We focus particularly on the rapid cultural, economic, political, and social transformations of Europe in the last two centuries, the projection of European power around the world, and the response to European imperialism both inside and outside of Europe.

Periodically

3

HIS 3340

Europe and the Middle East

Since ancient times, Europe and the Middle East have had a shared history, a history marked by both conflict and cooperation. This course explores European perceptions of - as well as conflicts and encounters with - the Middle East since the rise of Islam in the seventh century. We examine the political, military, economic, social, and cultural interactions between the two regions as well as the roots of contemporary problems.

Periodically

3

HIS 3345

Masculinities in Modern Europe

This course examines the many meanings and practices of masculinity in Europe since the French Revolution. Starting with the assumption that ideas about masculinity are culturally constructed, we explore the relationship of masculinities to nationalism, imperialism, work, sexuality, war, politics, and other important elements of modern European history. The role of masculinities in justifying and perpetuating, and at times undermining, systems of power based on race, gender, and sexuality are central to our analysis.

Periodically

3

HIS 3365

The British Empire

This course will examine the rise and fall of the British Empire, from its origins in Ireland to its decline and (with a few exceptions) fall in the twentieth century. Topics covered include migration, slavery, commerce and trade, anti-colonial nationalism, and ideas of race and gender.

Periodically

3

HIS 3450

Women in European History

A study of the changing role of women in European history is offered from the end of antiquity to the 20th century. Topics include women in public and private life, the economic and legal position of women, and the changing role of women in society.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

MUS 2031

History of Western Music: Ancient to Baroque

A study of the forms and styles of music from medieval chant to the music of Bach. An emphasis is placed on experiencing the music through listening and, where possible, participation.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MUS 1231, MUS 1232 or consent of instructor.

Fall, odd years

3

MUS 2032

History of Western Music: Classical to Modern

A study of Western music from Mozart and Haydn to the present.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: MUS 1232 or concurrent enrollment.

Spring, even years

3

PHI 3011

History of Philosophy I

An historical survey of western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the sixteenth century. Problems and theories in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and political philosophy are studied through the writings of the Pre-Socratics, followed by Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Epicureans, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Bacon, and Hobbes.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Previous course in Philosophy or consent of the instructor.

Periodically

3

PHI 3012

History of Philosophy II

A continuation of PHI 3011 from the seventeenth-century to the present. Philosophers studied include Spinoza, Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Nietzsche, Marx, Russell, and Wittgenstein, Quine, and Rorty.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Previous course in Philosophy or consent of the instructor.

Periodically

3

POS 3320

European Politics and Government

In this course, students examine a number of political systems of the European continent. We consider the governmental structures and political processes of Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Russia in detail. Then we briefly survey some elements of the post-Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, and conclude with a consideration of the significance and impact of the European Union.

Fall 2010, Fall 2013

3

D. The Americas

Code Course Credits

HIS 2410

History and Culture of Latin America

The pre-Columbian Indian cultures of the New World; the Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonial empires; the political and cultural divergence that followed independence; the economic and social problems of the Latin American republics and the course of their relations with the United States.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Spring, odd years

3

HIS 3210

Social History of Latin America

This course is designed to explore various issues in the social history of Latin America. Topics will include race and ethnic relations, labor, gender, rural society, and class as presented in the journal literature, therefore reflecting much of the latest research on these topics.

Periodically

3

HIS 3220

Revolutions in Latin America

This course examines the role revolutionary violence played in establishing a modern Atlantic world based on the idea of the liberal nation-state. We will take as our guiding assumption that liberation movements in Latin America played a key role in that process, but we will at times consider the critical influence of revolutions in North America and Europe on events in Latin America. We will especially consider the roles of nationalism, Marxism, and anti-colonialism in providing models for revolutionary violence.

This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.

Periodically

3

SPA 1180

Latin America: Past and Present

This course offers an introduction to Latin America by exploring the history, economy, and culture of this rich and diverse region. The multifaceted heritage, which is the backbone of Latin America, will be studied through documentaries, films, journal articles, literary and historical texts, architecture, music, and the visual arts.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Every semester

3

SPA 2030

Spanish American Cultures

Reading in a special topic area to introduce students to the Hispanic world. As topics change, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Spanish and English.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: Simultaneous registration in SPA 2012 or consent of instructor.

Spring

3

SPA 3060

Latin America: The Making of the Canon (1492-1899)

An introduction to the major authors, genres, and themes of Latin American Literature from 1492 through the 18th Century.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: SPA 3010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

SPA 3070

Latin America: The Making of the Canon (1900 to the present)

An introduction to the major authors, genres, and themes of Latin American Literature from 1900 to the present.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: SPA 3010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

SPA 3110

Latin American Novel and Short Story

Emphasis on contemporary writers such as Garcia Marquez, Carpentier, Borges and Rulfo. Taught in Spanish.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: SPA 3010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

SPA 3150

The Novel of the Mexican Revolution

This course will devote itself to the exploration of two main subjects: the response of the established Mexican literature to the phenomena of the revolution at the time and the production of a long-lasting literary activity that centers on the revolution and its consequences.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: SPA 3010 or consent of instructor.

Spring, even years

3

SPA 3160

Latin American Women Writers

This course focuses on the writings of the most prominent Latin American women writers of recent times. A variety of literary genres—poetry, essay, drama and novel will be studied. The topics of "machismo" and "marianismo" as well as the dynamics between the different socio-cultural realities and literature will be studied.

This course fulfills the Aesthetic Understanding or World Views Frame of Reference.

Prerequisite: SPA 3010 or consent of instructor.

Periodically

3

IV. Cultural Immersion (12 cr)

Code Course Credits

GLB 3810

Cultural Immersion Experience

  • Complete 12 credits or equivalent in a modern foreign language 12 cr

Study, work, intern, or volunteer abroad for 15 weeks in an approved cultural immersion experience. Not mere tourism, this requires students to make genuine efforts to engage with the society and culture of their host country. Students work closely with a Cultural Immersion Mentor to plan, carry out, and reflect on their activities abroad to gain meaningful insights that allow them to act knowledgeably and effectively as participants in that country and others. The student is responsible for arranging funding for the semester abroad.

Prerequisite: Complete the 6 core GLB courses; 6 credits or equivalent in foreign language; 9 credits in the GLB thematic and/or regional concentrations; and a Cultural Immersion Contract (obtained from the Global Studies Coordinator).

Every semester

0-2

V. Capstone (3 cr)

Code Course Credits

GLB 4610

Global Studies Capstone Seminar

This collaborative seminar is required of all students majoring in Global Studies. Students work together, discussing common readings, lectures and films that investigate a variety of concepts and issues to advance their understanding of the globalized world and their place in it. They critically analyze and evaluate the knowledge and perspectives they gained in their Global Studies coursework and cultural immersion abroad. Students then present their unique analysis and synthesis of their global education in a culminating research project. Emphasis is on systematically developing their own complex and mature world view, including their own global career path.

Prerequisite: GLB 3810.

Spring

3

(Credits required for the major: 51 cr)

And complete the University's Gen Ed requirements

Click here for General Education Requirements.

Law Degree (CU/VLS 3+2)

This major participates in the 3+2 program with Vermont Law School, in which highly-focused students can earn a Bachelor's degree in just three years at CU and a Juris Doctor (JD) degree in just two years at VLS.

For details, see the Law Degree page.